Writing for Children & Young Adults

Young Adult and Children’s books are hot! Here you’ll learn about trends in the marketplace, what’s working and what’s not, plus how to write for this very special group of readers without dumbing things down.

Waiting Out a Dark Cloud

Philip Beard persevered through the publishing industry's post-9/11 trauma to publish his novel, Dear Zoe. His story offers a telling look at how the industry's mood can launch—or crush—a writing career.

Advice from Agent Steven Malk


Steven Malk of Writer''s House, who handles children''s book authors like Jon Scieszka and Elise Primavera, talks about the advantages of having an agent, offers tips on choosing one, and reveals what he looks for in a manuscript.

Using Research as Inspiration for Picture Books

Jacqueline Briggs Martin, author of the Caldecott award-winning Snowflake Bentley, has written more than a dozen children''s books, many of which celebrate the natural world. Here she talks about how her research on historical figures, nature, and snowflake photographer Wilson Bentley spark pictured books that are part story, part fact.

Q&A With Newbery Winner Linda Sue Park

Linda Sue Parks won the 2002 Newbery Medal for her third novel A Single Shard. She talked to Children's Writer's & Illustrator's Market about working with her editor, getting ideas and doing research for her historical novels.

8 Basic Writing Blunders

These big-picture writing errors might make you cringe with recognition. But shake it off: Bestselling novelist Jerry B. Jenkins will help you fix them.

by Jerry B. Jenkins

Children”s Poetry Markets

Special thanks to Alice Pope, editor of 2008 Children''s Writer''s & Illustrator''s Market, for help with compiling this list. October 2007

Hook Kids’ Attention With Your Writing

Between the Internet, Nintendo and the TV remote how can "boring" books compete? If you've never asked yourself a similar question, you've probably never written anything for children. Marcia T. Jones and Debbie Dadey explain what it takes to grab a kid's attention and hold onto it from the beginning to "the end."