Writing for Children & Young Adults

Young Adult and Children’s books are hot! Here you’ll learn about trends in the marketplace, what’s working and what’s not, plus how to write for this very special group of readers without dumbing things down.

Q&A With Newbery Winner Linda Sue Park

Linda Sue Parks won the 2002 Newbery Medal for her third novel A Single Shard. She talked to Children's Writer's & Illustrator's Market about working with her editor, getting ideas and doing research for her historical novels.

8 Basic Writing Blunders

These big-picture writing errors might make you cringe with recognition. But shake it off: Bestselling novelist Jerry B. Jenkins will help you fix them.

by Jerry B. Jenkins

Children”s Poetry Markets

Special thanks to Alice Pope, editor of 2008 Children''s Writer''s & Illustrator''s Market, for help with compiling this list. October 2007

Hook Kids’ Attention With Your Writing

Between the Internet, Nintendo and the TV remote how can "boring" books compete? If you've never asked yourself a similar question, you've probably never written anything for children. Marcia T. Jones and Debbie Dadey explain what it takes to grab a kid's attention and hold onto it from the beginning to "the end."

5 Tips for Writing for Children

"Dialogue not only keeps young readers engrossed in the action, but also makes the page appear less formidable by breaking up the text." That's one of the tips from Tracey Dils, author of You Can Write Children's Books. Read more tips here.

Intensive Research Is Important for Children”s Nonfiction

Author Robie Harris'' books It''s Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health and It''s So Amazing!: A Book About Eggs, Sperm, Birth, Babies, and Families focus on sexual health for kids. Here, Harris talks about the process of doing extensive research as she prepared her manuscripts.