Seguidilla: Poetic Form

I’m a big fan of French forms, but there’s something special about the Spanish forms I find from time to time. That includes this week’s form: seguidilla.

Seguidilla Poems

Seguidilla is one of those poetic forms that started off as a song before eventually settling on an established poetic form. Specifically, seguidilla began as a dance song.

So here are the basic rules:

  • 7-line poem
  • Syllable count for each line is 7-5-7-5-5-7-5
  • One assonance rhyme between lines 2 and 4; another one between lines 5 and 7
  • Pause between lines 4 and 5–usually an end stop
  • Also, the tone or focus changes between lines 4 and 5 as well

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Here’s my attempt at a Seguidilla Poem:

The Darkness, by Robert Lee Brewer

When the clouds capture the moon
never to release,
I wander without purpose
solitary streets.
Each song sung in Spain
reminds me why darkness
surrounds me again.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community and author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53). Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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6 thoughts on “Seguidilla: Poetic Form

  1. Karen

    Goodnight

    Snuggled under the covers
    old man winter sings
    Marches with the lion king
    roaring it’s not spring.
    I sleep peacefully
    safe in my little cocoon
    deep in Never Land.

  2. Tracy Davidson

    Flight

    He promises he loves her…
    yet, again, she bleeds;
    too fragile to fight him off,
    too weary to flee.
    A nestling takes flight
    outside her window, making
    her swollen lips smile.

  3. PressOn

    This looks like a fascinating little form, Robert, and probably is an invitation to playing with sounds, given its history. Here is my attempt:

    AN AFTERNOON IN THE MOJAVE

    The desert is cool today;
    its shimmer is gone
    and the ravens are silent
    as they glide along.
    I hope cactus wrens
    will take exception to this
    and chatter again.

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