mystery

Fiction Writing

How to Write Suspense Like Stephen King

Aside from the fact that no less an authority than William Faulkner recommends reading widely in different styles and genres, there’s still another compelling reason why you might want to study Stephen King’s novels no matter what kind of writing you do. King is the number one horror writer in America, but you don’t...

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New Literary Agent Alert: Kira Watson of Emma Sweeney Agency, LLC

She is Seeking: Kira is particularly interested in Children's Literature (YA & MG) with a strong narrative voice, well-crafted storylines, and memorable characters. Within YA & MG, Kira is actively seeking Realistic Fiction, Speculative Fiction, Magic Realism, Thriller/Mystery, Horror, Fantasy, and Historical Fiction. Stories with folklore elements, complex villains, morally enigmatic (and very...

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4 Things Wayward Pines Can Teach Us About Writing

I think the general consensus among those writers who teach the craft is that you must read—and read widely—about the craft of writing, particularly those authors who write in your genre. But I think there’s a lot you can learn about writing from other mediums, too. Specifically television. Every other Monday, I’ll be bringing...

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4 Things True Detective (Season 1) Can Teach Us About Writing

I think the general consensus among those writers who teach the craft is that you must read—and read widely—about the craft of writing, particularly those authors who write in your genre. But I think there’s a lot you can learn about writing from other mediums, too. Specifically television. Every other Monday, I’ll be bringing...

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The Key to Better Writing? Study Screenwriting!

I feel obliged to preface this short piece with a disclaimer: I am no expert. On the other hand, I’m not sure anybody is. Three words you often hear in Hollywood—and I’ve heard them myself—are: “Nobody knows anything.” You hear it from producers, you hear it from directors, you hear it from agents. (I’m...

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Author Interview: Max Wirestone—Librarian to Author

It’s time for another debut author interview. I love debut author interviews because it gives people an opportunity to see what successful writers did right on their journeys. This interview is with Max Wirestone, who is a librarian in a small New Hampshire town. He lives in New England with his editor-husband and his non-editor...

Writer’s Digest Annual Competition

For 80 years, the Annual Writer’s Digest Competition has rewarded writers just like you for their finest work. We continue the tradition by giving away more than $30,000 in cash and prizes! Win a trip to the Writer's Digest Conference in New York City !

3 Ways to Know When to End Your Chapters

At some point in writing your novel, you have to start thinking about “chaptering,” the process of deciding exactly when and where your chapter breaks will go. Here are three simple, essential techniques that can help you make effective chapter pauses.

by Aaron Elkins

The Best and Worst of Writing Advice

When you gather a panel of writers to discuss the best and worst writing advice they’ve ever received, the conversation promises to be as colorful as it is informative—and this one with spy novelist Alex Dryden,  mystery novelist Lisa Gardner, author Alex Kava, and debut author Daniel Palmer, did not disappoint.

by Jessica...

Motivate Your Characters Like a Pro

In his session “The Psychology of Character Motivation,” Edgar-nominated author D.P. Lyle, MD, shared this invaluable exercise for developing your characters’ motivations as your story unfolds.

by Jessica Strawser, reporting from ThrillerFest 2010 (New York City)

From Idea to Page in 4 Simple Steps

Nothing is more exciting than the promise of a story in your head, but in order to get it on the page you need to figure out exactly what you need to do to make it work. Here are 4 steps to help you build the framework of your story.

by N.M....