Inspiring Books

As writers, we all love to read good books for inspiration. What book inspired you as a writer and why?

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4 thoughts on “Inspiring Books

  1. Cheyenne

    Word Count: 500.

    I don’t have authors who inspired me; I don’t even have a book that guides me. Instead I have family, people I actually know, those who I literally am connected to.

    As a young child, in 3rd and 4th grade, I started writing. My writing consisted of what I thought was the typical family, Mom, Dad, daughter, and the arrival of a new baby usually. I based my stories back then on what I wished to have (although I was already blessed with not one, but two baby sisters).

    My dad was in and out of my life, more out than in and because of this, I spent a lot of my time creating poems that exercised out my anger, animosity and sorrow that I felt because of him, or lack of. I should probably thank him someday because now I am able to express pure hurt and agony through words and compile them into a great work of art and analog.

    My grandpa gave me a lot of ambition. Though he was a man of very few words, I remember reading him a poem (ironically about my father) while sitting on the arm rest of the big purple chair in his living room and watching his face carefully for any sort of emotion. He showed none. And this made me more determined to write something better, something that will provoke him, something he’d adore or find funny. He was truly a great man, and now that he’s passed I spend a lot of time writing poems in my head about him, but never finding the courage to place the words on paper.

    My grandma was always there to listen to the random shit I threw together as a child and even as a teenager; Hell, she still listens now that I’m an adult. But if you ever need true constructive criticism, I advise finding someone other than her because she’s a grandma and she’ll tell me that every piece of writing I’ve ever shown her is the best one she’s read yet! She does that because she’s supposed to. But because of that, I’m confident in my writing – every single time.

    My mom, on the other hand, she’s been the one that kept me going. Every once in a while she’ll email me a poem that I wrote years and years ago and they all mean so much to me. Some days I’d beg her to read just one more of my stories (that just about all ended, and started, the same) and even though she and I both knew she had better things to do, she’d read them anyways with a small smile across her face. She’d cry during some of my more emotional poems, ones about my grandfather especially, and although she cried, I knew that it was a sign that my poem was great. Because of her small smiles or tears that wet her cheeks, I’m still aware that I do, indeed, have what it takes.

  2. orion1991

    Ayn Rand. I learned you can write a thousand pages about the same idea, and at the end of the novel it can still sound good. If I ever feel like I’m rambling, or my story can no longer be interesting, I remember Ayn Rand and i just rework my last few pages.

  3. Midnight_Beauty

    Stephen King’s On Writing was inspirational for me. I have always had a fear of being rejected, and I struggle with knowing where to begin. His book taught me to embrace being rejected because a person is growing closer to their dreams with each letter. After years of wondering where to begin and being afraid, I believe that I am ready to take a chance and get serious about my writing just to see where I can go with it.

  4. RobertCordaro

    Ok, I can’t remember all of them, but here are a few.
    The Lord of the Rings
    The Wheel of Time, all of them. (R.I.P. Robert Jordan)
    Imzadi (Star Trek, TNG book)
    Spocks World
    Anything by RA Salvatore
    Wizard at Large
    Wizards First Rule
    Anilmal Farm
    1984 (not supposed to be instructional!)
    The Last of the Mohicans
    A Clockwork Orange

    And that’s only the one’s piled on the floor next to my bed, I’ve got more!