The Weird Week in Writing: Parents take Twilight to the next level, Tyra Banks banks on YA fantasy, and rejection letters amaze

Freaky Friday—the latest from the weird and wonderful world of writing this week (followed, as always, by a weekend prompt): “Dracula” is too old fashioned: Twilight-inspired monikers top the latest list of the most popular baby names in America. Move over, Damon Wayans: Tyra Banks becomes the latest celebrity to score a book deal...

Rejection: It's What You Do Next That Counts

I have a dear friend, Dave, who has devoted his life to writing. He’s made every sacrifice imaginable, sacrifices that other people won’t or can’t make. This year, he has been submitting to more agents and publications than ever—and getting rejected. He wrote me recently to say that he felt more jaded every day...

Accepting rejection: 5 for Friday

5 quotes on rejection offering inspiration for when you need it most:  “This manuscript of yours that has just come back from another editor is a precious package. Don’t consider it rejected. Consider that you’ve addressed it ‘to the editor who can appreciate my work’ and it has simply come back stamped ‘Not at this...

Top 20 Lessons from WD: On Rejection

Hi writers, Thanks to everyone who stopped by Monday to read or chat with bestseller Dianna Love. And, of course, I’d also like to extend a Promptly Thank You to Dianna for sharing her prompts and insights. As promised, we’ll be giving away copies of Dianna’s Break Into Fiction to two random commenters. Jacqui...

Mid-Week Prompt: Rejecting the Rejection

Hey writers, Not too long ago, a strange thing happened in the storied submissions intake department of WD (my cluttered desk). In short, a writer pitched us a pretty solid idea, but we had run something similar in a previous issue, so I sent a polite “no,” and explained the situation.   My e-mail...

How Many Rejections Does it Take to Self-Publish a Book?

Q: I’ve submitted my manuscript and query letters to various agents and publishers and have received several rejections. I feel this book is pretty marketable. How many agent rejections and how many publisher rejections do you think I should take as a signal to self-publish this book? I’m pretty tenacious. If need be, I...

Dear Rejection…

Chapter After Chapter by Heather Sellers Write an acceptance letter to rejection.  Explore rejection.  What are the other time time you have been rejected?  Getting it down in writing helps to take the load off of that little slip of paper that comes in the mail, Sorry.  Often the fact that your work wasn’t...

Rejection IS better than nothing

Was talking to another editor yesterday about Novel & Short Story Writer’s Market–which is my current top priority project at work–when she, a fiction writer, mentioned that she had received two rejections in the past week. Suddenly, I felt envious–she was, at least, receiving rejections. She, at least, was submitting her work. I have not...

Are You Receiving Lots of Form Rejections?

Beginning Writer’s Answer Book I get lots of form rejections that have little or no feedback on my individual work. What might be wrong? Reasons for rejection can be incredibly subjective (indefinable issues of taste), or your work may not be polished enough. Aside from the quality and style of your work, consider if...

Making Sense of an Impersonal Rejection Letter

At the conference last weekend, an attendee raised a complaint to agents and editors when we were all sitting together on a panel. Rejections letters he received over time were usually impersonal – without any comments as to why the story was rejected; sometimes the letters were often xeroxed to the point that the...

I'm Excited About Rejection!

On Saturday, I received two rejections in the mail. And I was actually pumped up after reading them. Really, the first one from Asheville Poetry Review is the one that got me excited. While I could see it was a form rejection letter, there was a handwritten note at the bottom from the editor...

I’m Excited About Rejection!

On Saturday, I received two rejections in the mail. And I was actually pumped up after reading them. Really, the first one from Asheville Poetry Review is the one that got me excited. While I could see it was a form rejection letter, there was a handwritten note at the bottom from the editor...

Vacation, Poetry Readings, Rejection, Stamps?!?

After a week in the Appalachians, I’ve got Internet access again. Not sure if that’s a good or bad thing. Tomorrow, back to work! (We’ll slot that into the good column, though the week did go by a bit too fast.) ***** While in Georgia, I did happen to wander into a Sunday night...

Have No Fear

Editor Tyler Moss takes us on a brief tour of the January 2018 issue of Writer's Digest magazine.

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Ruth Emmie Lang

“7 Things I’ve Learned So Far” (this installment written by Ruth Emmie Lang, author of BEASTS OF EXTRAORDINARY CIRCUMSTANCE) is a recurring column where writers at any stage of their career can talk about writing advice and instruction, as well as how they got their literary agent—by sharing seven things they’ve learned along their...

5 Writing Perspectives to Be Thankful For

Every day at Writer’s Digest, I’m particularly thankful that I get to read about writing and edit some really skilled teachers and experts. The varied perspectives, voices and authorities on the craft keep me on my toes and enrich my experience as a writer and a reader. Today, I pulled five perspectives that I’m...

Develop Daily Writing Resilience to Succeed

“Writing is so difficult that I feel that writers, having had their hell on earth, will escape all punishment hereafter.”—Jessamyn West The dead aren’t supposed to walk among us, but they do. I’ve seen them—writers frazzled from publishing’s frenetic pace, spirits dead from unfulfilled and stressful career demands—empty shells, comatose like zombies moving among...

Meet the Agent: Christopher Rhodes, The Stuart Agency

Christopher Rhodes began his literary career as a teenager, working at bookstores in New Hampshire and then in New York City, where he landed a job at Borders’ flagship location in the World Trade Center. Three years later, Rhodes migrated to Simon & Schuster, working in sales and marketing before becoming an executive assistant...

5 Literary Agents Discuss the Horror Genre

A special treat on this Halloween morning: Five literary agents, who all represent the horror genre, took a break from reading manuscripts to answer a few questions on horror, including what they’re seeing a high demand for, what about a submission inspires confidence, and common weaknesses they see in writing. If you’re currently struggling...