Song writing ?

This topic contains 2 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  margery65w 2 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #347049

    margery65w
    Participant

    Has anyone tried writing songs?

    Got any tips on how to do it ?

    Not sure why, but I got an urge to try it yesterday.

    I do feel comfortable adding the music to the lyrics.

    Is there any relationship between song writing and poetry or are they completely disjoint.
    If I had to learn about poetry first then I would likely stick to straight fiction plus my non fiction work.

  • #656173

    timeradrake
    Participant

    Consider this: The USA’s anthem, “The Star Spangled Banner,” was given music decades after it was written. It was born, so to speak, as a poem.

    One of the reasons that I enjoy Eminem as a rapper isn’t his subject matter, or even the music. It’s the way he puts together indirect rhymes and even word rhythms into a kind of audio beat all its own.

    > Everybody always wants to discuss me
    > So that must mean I’m disgusting

    “Without Me.”

    I consider songs to be a parallel form of poetry. By that, I mean that songs employ words and word rhythms in many of the same ways that poetry does. It aims for audio audio effects more exclusively than poetry in broad.

    Poetry rhythms and patterns like iambic pentameter or such, they can be used to match the rhythm of the song to the rhythm of the song.

    I don’t think you need to remember what iambic, or dactylic means. But I think you’d do yourself a favor to be aware of those meters so that you can discover for yourself how they in setting the atmosphere and tone of a song.

    Also, a final note:

    > If I had to learn about poetry first then I would likely stick to straight fiction plus my non fiction work.

    Learning doesn’t have to mean sitting in a classroom and being told. You can learn by experience. You can learn poetry by listening to music. By attending poetry slams. By reading it and studying the rhythms and structures for yourself.

    Listen to a good Shakesperean actor portray the “Yorick” or “To Be” soliloquys. Especially if you have the text right in front of you to see how the actor interpreted it.

    The written word is capable of such magic. Formal education is one great way to learn that. But you can find it for yourself. You don’t need to spend tuition and sit in a classroom to do that.

    No one likes every kind of genre or form of writing. If poetry isn’t your thing, so be it. But if the idea of learning about words is that unappealing to you, then I feel like you’re hamstrung even in prose writing. I can’t imagine trying to write a piece without that learning process.

  • #656174

    margery65w
    Participant

    robjvargas wrote:

    > I consider songs to be a parallel form of poetry.
    >
    > Learning doesn’t have to mean sitting in a classroom and being told.
    >
    > No one likes every kind of genre or form of writing. If poetry isn’t your thing, so
    > be it.

    Thanks.

    I like learning. At least things that are of interest. Poetry is not really of interest to me.

    I do see the parallel now that you mention it. Just did not want to detour to learning poetry to try the writing of songs.

    I guess I will, at least for now, stick with non fiction, and some attempts at short stories then maybe a novel.

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