Rock Was Right Next To Me

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This topic contains 39 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  jennifernobile 10 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #469861

    jessie2020
    Participant

    Went to the Peninsula Hotel this afternoon to write. Sitting before my laptop…drinking tea…but not getting any work done because 30 minutes after I sat down Chris Rock sat down with his manager at the table next to mine

    I’m a huge fan of his, by the way. Rock was telling comedic war stories about his first time on The Tonight Show, about “Jerry,” about “Richard”…that sort of thing.

    And guess what, it’s hard to focus.

    RickLax

  • #324501

    jessie2020
    Participant
  • #469862

    Dee-Marie
    Participant

    RickLax.com – 2008-05-26 9:52 PM Went to the Peninsula Hotel this afternoon to write. Sitting before my laptop…drinking tea…but not getting any work done because 30 minutes after I sat down Chris Rock sat down with his manager at the table next to mine I’m a huge fan of his, by the way. Rock was telling comedic war stories about his first time on The Tonight Show, about “Jerry,” about “Richard”…that sort of thing. And guess what, it’s hard to focus. –RickLax

    Name dropper.  😉

    So, did you get his autograph?

  • #469863

    FinishLine
    Participant

    I had a similar problem once involving Courtney Cox, but then I guess these are the problems you want to have.

  • #469864

    CSachjen
    Participant

    Paradigm

  • #469865

    jshashaty
    Participant

     

      I was sitting on my Daddy’s shoulders when I saw Truman on the train.

  • #469866

    stardusty
    Participant

    Epic – 2008-05-30 6:30 AM

     

      I was sitting on my Daddy’s shoulders when I saw Truman on the train.

    Now THAT impresses me.

    And reminds me . . . I saw Elvis. The REAL one! 🙂

    There were lots of pretty girls around though, and, well, I let them distract me.

  • #469867

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    Wordminer – 2008-05-29 9:11 AM

    Epic – 2008-05-30 6:30 AM

     

      I was sitting on my Daddy’s shoulders when I saw Truman on the train.

    Now THAT impresses me. And reminds me . . . I saw Elvis. The REAL one! 🙂 There were lots of pretty girls around though, and, well, I let them distract me.

     

    Just about forty years ago, as a wee young girl, my wife got to sit in Elvis’s limo, had a nice long chat with Elvis, got an autograph, a scarf, etc.  I still haven’t heard the end of it.

  • #469868

    kajufa
    Participant

    What is this thing about Elvis anyway? My aunt and uncle visited graceland a few years back and cried….I mean really, he’s been deceased for years…..

    Famous people are just people too. 🙂

  • #469869

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    Susan – 2008-05-29 9:45 AM What is this thing about Elvis anyway? My aunt and uncle visited graceland a few years back and cried….I mean really, he’s been deceased for years….. Famous people are just people too. 🙂

     

    I don’t understand the fuss, either. People are people, famous or not, and making such a fuss over Elvis strikes me as silly. 

    John Wayne, however, is another story.

  • #469870

    Michael J. Bugeja
    Participant

    Let’s not forget Johnny Depp either lol.

    People are people…just some have more personality than others.

  • #469871

    jshashaty
    Participant
    Quote:
    Susan – 2008-05-29 9:45 AM What is this thing about Elvis anyway?  QUOTE]

     He was given a great gift.  His singing affected a lot of people. 

    Wise men say only fools rush in
    But I can’t help falling in love with you
    Shall I stay
    Would it be a sin
    If I can’t help falling in love with you

    Like a river flows surely to the sea
    Darling so it goes
    Some things are meant to be
    Take my hand, take my whole life too
    For I can’t help falling in love with you

    Like a river flows surely to the sea
    Darling so it goes
    Some things are meant to be
    Take my hand, take my whole life too
    For I can’t help falling in love with you
    For I can’t help falling in love with you

    words & music by george weiss – hugo peretti – luigi creatore)

  • #469872

    angel_smile
    Participant

    I, too, am a huge fan of Chris Rock and if I met him I’d probably be so excited that I’d tell everyone I knew at least twice… (I can be very repetitive). I understand that famous people are just people just like us, but when I’m given the opportunity to meet somebody whose talent and success I admire, I can become giddy and I secretly hope that I’m catching their creative energy. A week ago today, I met Augusten Burroughs and got my picture taken with him. I’m still feeling the high. Not because I think it’s exciting to meet someone famous, but because I think it ROCKS (pun intended) to meet someone who you truly admire, and I la-la-la LOVE Augusten Burroughs writing.

    My husband cries at every Packer game and seriously, if he met Brett Favre I don’t know what he’d do. Die maybe?

    I don’t think being excited about this type of thing is bragging, it’s just very exciting! I’d love to meet Chris Rock! And don’t get me started on Elvis. I’m convinced that when I die (and if I go to Heaven) that I’m going to hang out with Anne Frank a lot. She will be my best friend. I admire her to pieces.

    Congrats on your memoir!

    Heather

  • #469873

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    It’s been my experience that after you meet a couple of dozen famous people you soon start wishing you’d never met the first one, and pray you’ll never meet another.

    Some are nice enough, but a fair number of them do let it all go to their heads.

    Honestly, the fascination with the famous really makes me wonder just what people are thinking. I understand wanting to talk to someone who might have great philosophical things to say, or who might give great writing advice, or who really is a hero, or who made great sacrifices for mankind, but the fascination with people simply because they can sing or act is, I think, a bit weird.

    People actually watch shows such as Extra, Hollywood Insider, or whatever that thing is called, buy fan magazines, stand in line for hours just to catch a glimpse of someone, and are so caught up that paparazzo drive the very people the fans admire crazy just to get one picture for millions to talk about.

  • #469874

    lanabanana
    Participant

    That’s cool but like we’ve been saying:  People are just People.  It would be cool though to meet who we admire though.

    Sarah Jane 😉

  • #469875

    Dee-Marie
    Participant

    Jamesaritchie – 2008-05-29 11:01 AM It’s been my experience that after you meet a couple of dozen famous people you soon start wishing you’d never met the first one, and pray you’ll never meet another. Some are nice enough, but a fair number of them do let it all go to their heads. Honestly, the fascination with the famous really makes me wonder just what people are thinking. I understand wanting to talk to someone who might have great philosophical things to say, or who might give great writing advice, or who really is a hero, or who made great sacrifices for mankind, but the fascination with people simply because they can sing or act is, I think, a bit weird. People actually watch shows such as Extra, Hollywood Insider, or whatever that thing is called, buy fan magazines, stand in line for hours just to catch a glimpse of someone, and are so caught up that paparazzo drive the very people the fans admire crazy just to get one picture for millions to talk about.

    The media makes them all much bigger than life. It also edits and airbrushes what we see of them, so they seem to be better than the average person. Plus they’re brought right into our own living rooms, so we get a sense of intimacy.

    Personally, I’d be more thrilled to meet some of you all in the flesh.

  • #469876

    stardusty
    Participant

    pegs – 2008-05-30 12:20 PM

    Personally, I’d be more thrilled to meet some of you all in the flesh.

    [/QUOTE]

    You’re not about to try to recruit us to sell Amway, are you? 😉

  • #469877

    lanabanana
    Participant

    Oh yes now I change my mind, it’d be MUCH cooler to see some of you in person!

    Sarah Jane 😉

  • #469878

    kajufa
    Participant

    Jamesaritchie – 2008-05-29 9:25 AM

    Susan – 2008-05-29 9:45 AM What is this thing about Elvis anyway? My aunt and uncle visited graceland a few years back and cried….I mean really, he’s been deceased for years….. Famous people are just people too. 🙂

     

    I don’t understand the fuss, either. People are people, famous or not, and making such a fuss over Elvis strikes me as silly. 

    John Wayne, however, is another story.

     

    John Wayne is defintely another story– he was plain cool.  I LOVE his westerns.

  • #469879

    Janette
    Participant

    pegs – 2008-05-29 1:20 PM

    The media makes them all much bigger than life.

    That’s the camera. It adds ten pounds. Keep in mind that they use multiple cameras so you’re looking at thirty pounds minimum.

  • #469880

    Ann Emmert Abbott
    Participant

    I drank champagne with Tom Dewey at the Met. He’d just returned from Bermuda and had a gorgeous tan.

    I chased Allen Ginsberg through a hotel lobby in Boston.

    Tony Hillerman gave me tips on getting an agent.

    And Isaac Asimov and I … but that’s a tale for the memoir. Tease.

  • #469881

    jessie2020
    Participant

    pegs – 2008-05-27 12:47 AM

    RickLax.com – 2008-05-26 9:52 PM Went to the Peninsula Hotel this afternoon to write. Sitting before my laptop…drinking tea…but not getting any work done because 30 minutes after I sat down Chris Rock sat down with his manager at the table next to mine I’m a huge fan of his, by the way. Rock was telling comedic war stories about his first time on The Tonight Show, about “Jerry,” about “Richard”…that sort of thing. And guess what, it’s hard to focus. –RickLax

    Name dropper.  😉

    So, did you get his autograph?

    No. But we did talk for about two minutes. Really nice guy.

    Rick’s Blog

  • #469882

    jessie2020
    Participant

    Jamesaritchie – 2008-05-29 12:01 PM

    It’s been my experience that after you meet a couple of dozen famous people you soon start wishing you’d never met the first one, and pray you’ll never meet another.

    Some are nice enough, but a fair number of them do let it all go to their heads.

    Honestly, the fascination with the famous really makes me wonder just what people are thinking. I understand wanting to talk to someone who might have great philosophical things to say, or who might give great writing advice, or who really is a hero, or who made great sacrifices for mankind, but the fascination with people simply because they can sing or act is, I think, a bit weird.

    People actually watch shows such as Extra, Hollywood Insider, or whatever that thing is called, buy fan magazines, stand in line for hours just to catch a glimpse of someone, and are so caught up that paparazzo drive the very people the fans admire crazy just to get one picture for millions to talk about.

    Come on…do you NEVER watch those shows? I confess that I do. The protagonist in my favorite novel is a celebrity worshipper. (All The Names, Jose Saramago). Hmmm…guess they just live more exciting lives than us…

    Rick’s Blog

  • #469883

    jessie2020
    Participant

    Georganna – 2008-05-29 9:54 PM

    I drank champagne with Tom Dewey at the Met. He’d just returned from Bermuda and had a gorgeous tan.

    I chased Allen Ginsberg through a hotel lobby in Boston.

    Tony Hillerman gave me tips on getting an agent.

    And Isaac Asimov and I … but that’s a tale for the memoir. Tease.

    Just chased? I gotta believe you could catch that guy. His mind moves fast…but his body?

  • #469884

    dixiegirl
    Participant

    There are others who love John Wayne? I’m not the only one? Too cool!

    A friend told me that she got on an elevator, and there was this nice looking guy that got on. He looked at her and asked if she knew who he was. She didn’t and he was quite indignant. It was Matthew McConaughey. Just for fun, I may have added, “Who?”

  • #469885

    Eve
    Participant

    I have had the opportunity to meet a few celebs through the years of my dog showing/breeding ventures. I sold a dog to Karl Malone of Utah Jazz fame. What a nice, polite, gentleman. My at-the-time young son was smitten so Karl graciously talked to him on the phone for a while and sent him autographed posters and photos of himself with the dog. For some time after that, every time the phone rang my son raced to answer it in case it was Karl calling again. LOL! I talked to Eddy Murphy on the phone once. Sold a couple of dogs to Maurice Jarre, an academy award winning musician who won for his movie scores in Dr. Zhivago and Gorillas In the Mist. A very down to earth man that invited me to his home in Malibu. I went and had a nice visit with him and his wife. Saw Wayne Newton in a hotel lobby in Vegas. Husband said “Look! There’s Wayne Newton!” I turned around to look and the guy was within a few feet of us – with a buxom blond on each arm. I was disgusted with the arrogant display and just said, “So what!” and turned my back to show my non interest. Husband was mortified.

    So yeah, celebs are just people too. Some are nicer than others and don’t hold themselves as superior due to their celeb status. Others? Well, they have a ways to go in the personal development department. The celebs I dealt with didn’t get preferential treatment from me when it came to selling them dogs. They had to go through the same drill and answer the same questions as any other potential purchaser. The dogs and their future well being were my first concern. The celebs only got to buy one when the criteria was met – and they paid the same price as anyone else. I didn’t gouge them because of who they were and how much money they made like some people did/do. I always thought that was so unethical.

    Do any of you remember a show (not that good as I remember) called That’s my Bush? It was on a few years ago and was a parody of President Bush in the White house. The Springer Spaniel in the show was one of mine.

    That’s about the extent of my name dropping.

    Susan

  • #469886

    Michael J. Bugeja
    Participant

    I’ve had the opportunity to meet and interview stars. The cast of “Friends” (even the monkey), “Days of Our Lives,” “Wings,” “Sisters,” “The John Larroquette Show” if you remember those programs, Jay Leno (very nice man), Kevin Eubanks, Dustin Hoffman (back stage of “The Tonight Show), Jim Harrison (very charming), Floyd Red Crow Westerman, Jai Joshi (extremely nice), and others. Oh, and let’s not forget drinks with George Clooney–wink, wink (great story). I’m not trying to brag but rather just share my experience. Some of these people were nicer than others. Some were just downright odd while another was rude towards women. I think these people are in the spotlight for a reason, though. They each seem to enjoy it, and don’t go blaming the media for adding ten pounds to their egos. Guess what seems to sell? The public at large craves this information. Perhaps it’s an escape from their own lives. I don’t judge since I too am fascinated by the plastic world of Hollywood lol.

  • #469887

    jennifernobile
    Participant

    As part of my college scholarship job, I used to hand Dick Cavett a glass of milk every morning,back when no one knew who Cavett was.

    And just happen to have been writing this one up:

    San Francisco’s North Beach some time in 1961-62. I’m on weekend leave from the Presidio of Monterey. I know the city well, having spent the previous two years in
    nearby Menlo Park. I arrange a rendezvous time and place and separate myself from the Army guys I rode up to the city with. I’m not interested in browsing the touristy spots on Broadway, so I stop in at Barnaby Conrad’s El Matador for a quick beer before moving on. I slide onto an empty barstool and hear a familiar voice issuing from the man on my left. I’m sitting next to Jonathan Winters.

    He’s drinking ice water, this being a few years after his drunken antics in the rigging of the Balclutha in Fisherman’s Wharf. To my surprise, he ignores the other glitterati sitting around the bar and draws me into conversation. In answer to his inquiries, I tell him I’m a Specialist Fourth Class in the U.S. Army’s Reserve Linguist Training Program and am studying Russian at the then Army Language School (soon to become the Defense Language Institute of the West Coast.

    As we are chatting, he pulls from an inside coat pocket what looks like a checkbook but has blank pages instead of checks. He begins sketching something with a fountain pen. He mentions that if he had not gone into comedy he would have tried to make it as a cartoonist. I finish my beer and am about to leave and seek out a grog house more suitable to an E4’s income when he tears a page out of the book, hands it to me and gives me a farewell handshake.

    Outside under a streetlight I take a close look at the sheet of paper. On it he has drawn an excellent cartoon showing two owls wearing uniforms and standing in ranks for inspection. One owl is turned slightly toward the other and you can see a corporal’s chevrons on his uniform sleeve. It’s clear he is whispering or murmuring something to the other owl. Below is the caption: “Thought I’d better warn you, Ludlow. You have mouse breath.”

    Do I have the cartoon framed and hanging in my study? Have I checked out eBay to see what value it might have? No and no. I somehow managed to lose it. I don’t know how or where.

  • #469888

    sherey
    Participant

    Kerry,

    What a great story. Thanks for sharing this.

  • #469889

    stardusty
    Participant

    Kerry,

    I love that story. Thanks for posting it.

  • #469890

    Dee-Marie
    Participant

    That is a great story! One of these days I bet you come across that thing. Probably stuck in a book as a bookmark or something.

    Very cool. 

  • #469891

    Voskamp
    Blocked

    In 1964 I was staying at the Manhattan Hotel in NYC.  While waiting in the cocktail lounge for a friend, a group of three men walked in.  Other than them, I was the only one in the lounge.  The bartender walked over and took their order and then came to my table, saying the gentleman in the middle would like to buy me a drink, as he politely nodded his head and waved.  I politely refused.  That evening my friend and I had tickets in the loge area overlooking the stage.  The man who asked me to have a drink with him and the other two was none other than Sydney Chaplin (Charlie’s son), who had the lead male role in FUNNY GIRL with Barbara Streisand.  What a missed opportunity!  Oh well, the story of my life, missed opportunities.

    Lillies

  • #469892

    ljb1947
    Participant

    Jamesaritchie – 2008-05-29 11:25 AM

    Susan – 2008-05-29 9:45 AM What is this thing about Elvis anyway? My aunt and uncle visited graceland a few years back and cried….I mean really, he’s been deceased for years….. Famous people are just people too. 🙂

     

    I don’t understand the fuss, either. People are people, famous or not, and making such a fuss over Elvis strikes me as silly. 

    John Wayne, however, is another story.

    Nope. I don’t get it. They’re entertainers. We pay them mostly more than they’re worth to do acts for us.

    Elvis or John Wayne would get my attention because THAT would be story material. But otherwise, why get all that excited? *shrug*

    I’m sure there is some good psychological explanation, but whatever that psychology is I don’t share it.

  • #469893

    Robert
    Participant

    For some reason many people think I am someone else — although they are never quite sure whom. (I have been told I bear a resemblance to Donald Sutherland, so perhaps that’s it. But I don’t think the resemblance has persisted.) In restaurants and saloons I have been approached with variations on “Are you who I think you are?” Autographs have been requested. Glances and nods have been made in my direction, along with elbow-nudges and even pointing. There are upsides to this: maitre d’s of fancy restaurants I have never visited have welcomed me “back” with unwarranted fuss and better tables. And I get to tell my wife “I told you so” when a stranger who has been staring in my direction approaches to say hello or ask to shake my hand. Still, I would not want to be whatever celebrity people think I am. The attention is disquieting.

    Even the famous are themselves taken in. One morning many years ago I was lounging in a beach chair in Zihuatanejo while the movie “Yellow Beard” was in production nearby. The cast and some of the crew were staying at the same hotel. My wife saw a gentleman walking along the beach and said, “There’s James Mason!” I glanced up at him and he looked at me and turned to walk in my direction, a big smile appearing on his face. As he came closer he said, “Err, ahosdouf blvgndkhd, blub-blub.” And when he was close enough to see me more clearly he continued, “Uh. Never mind.” And went on his way.

    Fame is fleeting.

  • #469894

    Ann Emmert Abbott
    Participant

    Is anyone as antique as I and remembers the beginnings of network television? Early in the Today Show history, poor Dave Garroway had to suffer the antics of a sidekick that was truly an animal (kind of like McMahon). J. Fred Muggs, a chimpanzee, cavorted about in diapers, doing as he willed on the set for about four years. See the Wiki in this instance for more.

    About half way through his tenure, my family vacationed in Columbus to attend the Ohio State Fair. In the elevator, on our way down from our hotel room, my Daddy nudged me to look down. There right beside me, gazing calmly into my eyes, was the chimp! He was standing, holding the hand of a man. I was so stunned I couldn’t say a word. I think the man handed us an “autographed” photo of J. Fred.

    Ah, another brush with fame!

  • #469895

    kajufa
    Participant

    jrtomlin – 2008-06-25 10:42 AM

    Jamesaritchie – 2008-05-29 11:25 AM

    Susan – 2008-05-29 9:45 AM What is this thing about Elvis anyway? My aunt and uncle visited graceland a few years back and cried….I mean really, he’s been deceased for years….. Famous people are just people too. 🙂

     

    I don’t understand the fuss, either. People are people, famous or not, and making such a fuss over Elvis strikes me as silly. 

    John Wayne, however, is another story.

    Nope. I don’t get it. They’re entertainers. We pay them mostly more than they’re worth to do acts for us. Elvis or John Wayne would get my attention because THAT would be story material. But otherwise, why get all that excited? *shrug* I’m sure there is some good psychological explanation, but whatever that psychology is I don’t share it.

     

    I do know a few people who have lived in the limelight and are known in the world and, believe me, they are just like the rest of the world.  All fame means is that someone is well known in the world.  But, how about all of us people are famous within our own communities, or friends and/or families like we all are to some degree?  Sheesh, nobody gets all excited over us. 🙂 🙂

    When I was a youngster, I wanted to only hang with popular kids because I thought it would make me popular (I was, in fact, very shy and the brunt of jokes).  One new boy came to school and before I would let him be my friend, I asked, “Well, were you popular at your old school?”

    He looked me straight in the eye and said, “I am popular among my family and friends.”

    Pretty cool, huh? So, just think- we are all “famous” with someone for something!!

     

  • #469896

    Mark Lewis
    Participant

    I lived in Springfield, Missouri for 15 years. One night, I went to a friend’s holiday party. I was 22 years old, and he was still in high school. Most of the people at the party were his age, and I felt very out of place.

    I was just thinking about leaving when my friend brought someone over and introduced us to each other. He was a skinny kid, and we talked about music for a long time. He had several girls trying to get his attention during our conversation, but it was obvious that he wasn’t interested in any of them – he only wanted to talk about music.

    He was a nice guy, and he had good taste in music, but I can never understand what would have made him pick Angelina over Jennifer.

    Later, a friend of my wife almost fainted when I told her about meeting Brad Pitt.

     

    Jeff C

  • #469897

    killykilly79
    Participant

    I went to a backstage party with the Bellamy Brothers and the Oakridge Boys, once. All very nice.

  • #469898

    jessie2020
    Participant

    tranquilmyst – 2008-06-22 11:40 AM

    I have had the opportunity to meet a few celebs through the years of my dog showing/breeding ventures. I sold a dog to Karl Malone of Utah Jazz fame. What a nice, polite, gentleman. My at-the-time young son was smitten so Karl graciously talked to him on the phone for a while and sent him autographed posters and photos of himself with the dog. For some time after that, every time the phone rang my son raced to answer it in case it was Karl calling again. LOL! I talked to Eddy Murphy on the phone once. Sold a couple of dogs to Maurice Jarre, an academy award winning musician who won for his movie scores in Dr. Zhivago and Gorillas In the Mist. A very down to earth man that invited me to his home in Malibu. I went and had a nice visit with him and his wife. Saw Wayne Newton in a hotel lobby in Vegas. Husband said “Look! There’s Wayne Newton!” I turned around to look and the guy was within a few feet of us – with a buxom blond on each arm. I was disgusted with the arrogant display and just said, “So what!” and turned my back to show my non interest. Husband was mortified.

    So yeah, celebs are just people too. Some are nicer than others and don’t hold themselves as superior due to their celeb status. Others? Well, they have a ways to go in the personal development department. The celebs I dealt with didn’t get preferential treatment from me when it came to selling them dogs. They had to go through the same drill and answer the same questions as any other potential purchaser. The dogs and their future well being were my first concern. The celebs only got to buy one when the criteria was met – and they paid the same price as anyone else. I didn’t gouge them because of who they were and how much money they made like some people did/do. I always thought that was so unethical.

    Do any of you remember a show (not that good as I remember) called That’s my Bush? It was on a few years ago and was a parody of President Bush in the White house. The Springer Spaniel in the show was one of mine.

    That’s about the extent of my name dropping.

    Susan

    Good work! As I remember, the dog was a finer actor than anybody else on that show.

    -Ricky @ http://ricklax.com

  • #469899

    jennifernobile
    Participant

    A wealthy acquaintance of mine is one of those “pretty good golfers” who likes to get involved in celebrity pro-amateur tournaments.
    In one such situation, he shook hands with the celebrity fourth of his foursome without recognizing either face or name. He played two or three holes and finally asked the celebrity what he did for a living. “I play harmonica,” was the answer.

    A hole or two later my acquaintance asked, “Can anyone earn a living playing a harmonica?” and the celebrity mentioned the number of millions he had grossed the previous tax year. Seeing confusion on my friend’s face, the celebrity asked, “Do you have any children who like music?”

    “Yes,” friend replied.

    “Just tell them that you played a round of golf with Huey Lewis.”

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