Rejection?

This topic contains 20 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 10 months ago.

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  • #346603

    Anonymous

    Hi everyone…..Gabriel here…..Happy Thanksgiving!!! We all know that rejection is just part of the show…..but the other day I received one that I’ve never gotten before. I was rejected…..wait for it…… because I didnt my own website or blog??? Has anyone had this type of rejection before? I get that marketing and pushing your own book is definitely part of the process….but a rejection based off of that…when in the same breath said that they really liked the concept. Are agents looking for us to be that involved already or is this some new form of an easy let down? Thanks all!

  • #655023

    Anonymous

    I got rejected from an online magazine.

  • #655024

    Anonymous

    Is your work non-fiction? Generally non-fiction writers are required to have some sort of website and such as way to give credence to your credibility.

  • #655025

    Anonymous

    Yeah, if it was nonfiction, then you need something for “credibility”. But if it’s fiction – you’re probably lucky you didn’t get picked by those folks. They essentially expected you to do their job.

  • #655026

    Anonymous

    I’m assuming having something like facebook, wattpad, or some other social media doesn’t count, right? I ask because my first book I’ll be trying to publish is based on something that happened.

  • #655027

    Anonymous

    Facebook counts – if you have a couple thousand followers, that will go a long way. Twitter is big in the literary world – don’t know why, but it is.

  • #655028

    Anonymous

    Was for a childrens picture book……go figure.

  • #655029

    Anonymous

    Oh wow, I have a facebook, but not that many followers. Will either have to work on that or maybe start a blog…
    Gabriel – I’m sorry to hear about the rejection. That really is a ridiculous reason. Seems so hard to get published nowadays… I’m still working on my first book and have been told self-publishing is the way to go. I’d rather be traditionally published, but it seems really tough.

  • #655030

    Anonymous

    kris0707 wrote:
    > Seems so hard to get published nowadays… I’m still
    > working on my first book and have been told self-publishing is the way to
    > go. I’d rather be traditionally published, but it seems really tough.

    Getting trade published is hard – but self-publishing well is just as hard. There’s much more to it than just popping it up on Amazon – editing is all up to you (unless you can afford to hire proper editors) and so is marketing – which is not only difficult but time consuming if you really want to do it right. JMHO, but one should not self-publish under the assumption it’s easier – one should self-publish because you want the challenge of being a publisher as well as an author.

  • #655031

    Anonymous

    Facebook is tied into Instagram. It’s probably the best social media combination to advertise and promote with – just look at the stock valuation. Also, Facebook is inexpensive. You can start a campaign for as little as $5 a day for as many or few days as you like. You can also specify your target audience. I use it and run week long campaigns on and off all the time. As a matter of fact, one of my self published books is 1 year old today (11-19-17) and I have sold just over 2500 copies – most of that is in the e-book format.

  • #655032

    Anonymous

    Ostarella – I have heard that self-publishing can get pretty expensive which worries me a bit. Honestly, I probably shouldn’t be worrying about publishing so much since I’m not yet done with my story anyway, but getting published seems like such a daunting task. It’s hard not to think about it at all ahead of time. Admittedly, I was thinking of self-publishing for my first book just because everyone has to start somewhere, but if it’s really as difficult as trad publishing, I might as well go for it.

    Brien Sz – You say you are self-published? Did you self-publish on Amazon and how expensive did it get? 2500 copies is great! Congrats on that. =)

  • #655033

    Anonymous

    kris0707 wrote:
    > getting
    > published seems like such a daunting task.

    Writing can be pretty daunting – but you’re doing it, one step at a time. 🙂

  • #655034

    Anonymous

    It was not expensive for me at all. It can be. If you pay editors – that can cost. I did not pay. Thankfully I have someone who is great at pointing out those errors and such. It can cost a lot for a cover design. Mine did not. I paid $30 for a photo on iPhoto (stock company) for use up to 500,000 copies – I’ll cross that bridge should I sell more than that. After purchasing the photo, I did my own layout of the book. Simple is usually best. The only thing it cost was my time. I know someone who paid for her cover – cost her a couple hundred dollars. So the answer to your question is really… how much can you do on your own? My book cost me thirty dollars in an outlay of revenue – the rest was my own sweat and blood.

    Also, I used a template for my layout that CreateSpace provides.

  • #655035

    Anonymous

    Brien Sz wrote:
    > It was not expensive for me at all. It can be. If you pay editors – that
    > can cost. I did not pay. Thankfully I have someone who is great at
    > pointing out those errors and such. It can cost a lot for a cover design.
    > Mine did not. I paid $30 for a photo on iPhoto (stock company) for use up
    > to 500,000 copies – I’ll cross that bridge should I sell more than that.
    > After purchasing the photo, I did my own layout of the book. Simple is
    > usually best. The only thing it cost was my time. I know someone who paid
    > for her cover – cost her a couple hundred dollars. So the answer to your
    > question is really… how much can you do on your own? My book cost me
    > thirty dollars in an outlay of revenue – the rest was my own sweat and
    > blood.
    >
    > Also, I used a template for my layout that CreateSpace provides.

    Just a quick reminder to pay yourself, too.

    When a corporation comes up with a product, the cost that they calculate isn’t just the materials, or capital expenditures. They also account for the time to research and test the device, the payroll costs to build it, the marketing expenses, INCLUDING the time, travel, and media costs.

    A lot of individuals working for themselves forget to look at their own work as a cost of what they are doing. Editing, writing, cover design, marketing, printing, that’s time. YOUR time. A realistic assessment of the financial success of a book should account for that.

  • #655036

    AngelinaK52
    Participant

    Good point Rob. Come tax time you need to account for all of your time, which will greatly reduce or even eliminate what you have to pay Uncle Sam.

  • #655037

    Anonymous

    RobTheThird wrote:
    >
    > Just a quick reminder to pay yourself, too.
    >
    > When a corporation comes up with a product, the cost that they calculate isn’t just
    > the materials, or capital expenditures. They also account for the time to research
    > and test the device, the payroll costs to build it, the marketing expenses, INCLUDING
    > the time, travel, and media costs.
    >
    > A lot of individuals working for themselves forget to look at their own work as a
    > cost of what they are doing. Editing, writing, cover design, marketing, printing,
    > that’s time. YOUR time. A realistic assessment of the financial success of a book
    > should account for that.

    This is something that was drummed into us when I took classes from the SBA. People would come up with their business plan and the instructor would come back with “Okay, you’re working for ten cents an hour. Can you really live on that?”. Granted, most writers don’t live off their writing anyway, but we shouldn’t just give our work away either.

    The other thing to bear in mind is “opportunity cost” – what else could you be doing with that time and money? For me, that’s time spent actually writing, a major reason I decided not to go the SP route.

    In no way am I saying don’t self-publish. Some people do it successfully and love the process. But you definitely want to consider all aspects before starting out.

  • #655038

    Anonymous

    I have my tax write offs mostly accounted for.

    Since I have three books out – two under one name and the third under another, the time I put in (aside from the writing) was mostly – What is my book cover idea? Once I had that, the execution wasn’t that hard. Like I said, my one book I used a stock photo and did the graphic art – not terribly time consuming once I had the vision of what I wanted. The second, I used one of my own photo’s and the design from there was simple. The third took a little more time. I needed a prop. Then in Photoshop, create blood. I watched several tutorials on YouTube on how to do this in Photoshop, which I am pretty good at, then work at the technique until I achieved what I wanted.

    Also, when venturing into self publishing, you have no idea what will come of it. You can draw up many plans for success but it doesn’t mean the public will bite. Since income from my books is really dessert to our family income, the time I put into it flows from passion and chance. Should I be so fortunate as to accumulate significant income, then I will adhere to more stringent business practices. Right now, I do not look at the ledger in such a way that my self worth in time outweighs the effort I am putting in. If that was the case, none of us would write because the sweat equity would most likely far outweigh the financial return.

    I still harbor dreams of traditional publishing as an ultimate goal. However, after canvassing and querying agents for more than a year on two of my books, I opted to see what I could catch on my own. One of them, thankfully, does okay. My third book that I wrote under, still, another alias, is a collection of short stories having nothing to do with the horror genre that the other two are in.

  • #655039

    Anonymous

    Ostarella – Yeah, writing has proven to be a challenge all it’s own, but it’s a fun and satisfying process. Well worth it lol.

    Brien Sz – I do have some family members who are teachers so perhaps that could work in my favor, but I do think I may have to pay a bit for a cover. It could help me to look at a few how to videos on youtube, but I don’t know. Lol, I always end up unsatisfied with my own work on Photoshop so I see it more likely for me to pay for a cover. That’s cool it only cost you thirty dollars. =)

    RobTheThird – Huh, I’d pay myself, but honestly, I think I’m taking more time on this than I should or the average person so I’d hate to overprice something lol.

    I don’t see myself being able to trad publish my first story because it may turn out to be a Novella and it’ll be LGBT. It isn’t quite Non-fiction, but it’s about 90% a true story. This would be easier self-published, wouldn’t it? I’ve heard both Novellas and LGBT are hard to find publishers for.

  • #655040

    AngelinaK52
    Participant

    Novellas may be harder to place, but LGBT is in big demand these days. Anything with diverse characters is in big demand.

  • #655041

    jIPPity
    Participant

    What Terry said. Novellas are very difficult to place with a traditional publisher, as even Steven King found out in his early years. But many agents are hungry for narratives featuring diverse characters. I see that all the time from agents who sign up for ThrillerFest’s PitchFest.

    –Warren

  • #655042

    Anonymous

    T.A. Rodgers and wdarcy – Thanks so much for letting me know! As a new writer, I’m still learning to work up to enough words for a novel so I’m hoping this first book can be one, but so far each draft has only been Novella or even Novellete size. Still have a lot of editing to do, though. I’m glad to hear LGBT/diverse characters are in high demand, after all at least. =)

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