Nominations Now Open: What Annoys You Most?

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This topic contains 75 replies, has 41 voices, and was last updated by  janicekatz 9 years ago.

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  • #331219

    superman13
    Participant
  • #543190

    superman13
    Participant

    [First, a disclaimer:  This thread is not intended to disparage the writing or reputation of anyone posting here.  After all, we all love each other, and no one here annoys anyone else.]

    When it comes to style – correct, incorrect, or somewhere in between – we all have our own.  That’s the joy of writing.  But stylistically, what annoys you most about other people’s writing, either online or in print?

    For me, it’s excessive exclamation marks, particularly when used in combination with internet shorthand … LOL!!!!!!!!!!

  • #543191

    tylerbc021
    Participant

    Before I came here I frequented on fictionpress, and it anoyed me when they forget punctuation marks. Their profile will say middle aged educated individual, but I know 1st years that can remember their punctuation! James Joyce they ain’t.

  • #543192

    John Holton
    Participant

    Well…since you asked…
    It bugs me when “the” is consistantly spelled “teh”. 😀

  • #543193

    superman13
    Participant

    hvnlykarma – 2009-09-03 7:12 PM Well…since you asked… It bugs me when “the” is consistantly spelled “teh”. 😀

    LOL!!!!!!!!!

  • #543194

    pkubin
    Participant

    A pet peeve of mine is the misuse of “your” and “you’re.”

    But if you want to know what annoys me about someone’s personal style, I’d have to say that I hate the use of “then” when listing off a sequence of actions. I.E. “this happened, then he did this, then this.” To me, it seems like nothing more or less than author intrusion when they use that word.

  • #543195

    superman13
    Participant

    Hopelessly hopeful – 2009-09-03 7:34 PM A pet peeve of mine is the misuse of “your” and “you’re.” But if you want to know what annoys me about someone’s personal style, I’d have to say that I hate the use of “then” when listing off a sequence of actions. I.E. “this happened, then he did this, then this.” To me, it seems like nothing more or less than author intrusion when they use that word.

     Then your saying that bothers you?  LOL!!!!!!!!

  • #543196

    pkubin
    Participant

    Ultimate Cheapskate – 2009-09-03 7:37 PM

     Then your saying that bothers you?  LOL!!!!!!!!

    LOL!  Aaaaaaahh!  *runs away*

  • #543197

    worthtells
    Participant

    Ultimate Cheapskate – 2009-09-03 4:18 PM

    hvnlykarma – 2009-09-03 7:12 PM Well…since you asked… It bugs me when “the” is consistantly spelled “teh”. 😀

    LOL!!!!!!!!!

    ROFL!!!!!!! 😉

    mispelings, random cApiTaliZatIon, and, improper punctuation mark’s really annoy me.

  • #543198

    Kyle Bartletta
    Participant

    I’ve spent most of the last week reading court transcripts, summarizing testimony for a law firm, so what’s annoying me right now isn’t how some people write, but how they talk. Maybe it’s worse seeing their words in written form. One such annoyance is the overuse of the word LIKE. Some examples from a supposedly well-educated, 40+ year old female witness: there was like no dishes; there’s like nothing on the counter; I’m like you’re kidding; one bikini is like really her favorite; It was like what was that?; I’m like, I don’t want to do this, and then I’m like okay.

    That is so like really annoying. 🙁

  • #543199

    ljb1947
    Participant

    I’m with Elmore Leonard on this: The word “suddenly” makes me want to shake someone.

    Suddenly the shot rang out. And how, my dears, does a shot ring out gradually?

    Suddenly the man jumped out from behind the bush. *blinks* Oh, really?

    It annoys me no end.

  • #543200

    chesterwoolah
    Participant

    LOL. You guys are hilarious!

    This isn’t really a style of writing, more of a grammar mistake. But tons of people in a mom’s group I’m in confuse “than” with “then” and I don’t understand how? Don’t we learn that in 3rd grade?

  • #543201

    mlghaley
    Participant

    There are so many….I have to admit I’m bad to use “then” much too often. When I’m editing and find this over and over I cringe. What annoys me the most is to see something, anything, written by a so-called professional with numerous grammar and spelling errors. A lot of people believe it’s okay not to check for these things when posting in a forum, or even a blog, but if you’re a professional, shouldn’t you make certain what you’ve written, no matter where it is, is coherent? What if the agent you plan to query reads your post? As soon as they see your name on the envelope, and recall all the typos, they’re going to trash your query straight away, or at least I would.

  • #543202

    cypher
    Participant

    Flitting in and out of past and present tenses aggravates me.

    As for myself, I know I use ‘all’ and ‘just’ way too much. But editing is all just too much for me.

  • #543203

    John Holton
    Participant

    Ultimate Cheapskate – 2009-09-03 5:18 PM

    hvnlykarma – 2009-09-03 7:12 PM Well…since you asked… It bugs me when “the” is consistantly spelled “teh”. 😀

    LOL!!!!!!!!!

     (bows)

  • #543204

    Carmela Jones
    Participant

    Constant use of the abbreviation “lol” makes me want to gnash my teeth, scream and scratch out my eyes.

  • #543205

    pkubin
    Participant

    Another thing that annoys me (yes, a lot of things annoy me 🙂 ) is when people type “ect.” and “ex” instead of “etc.” and “e.g.”

  • #543206

    charliebrown20
    Participant

    The unending ellipsis………….especially when it’s not even appropriate for the sentence……….and you’re wondering if it’s really an SOS signal………..from the author……..under the guise of writing……….

  • #543207

    pkubin
    Participant

    Lexi – 2009-09-04 9:09 AM

    The unending ellipsis………….especially when it’s not even appropriate for the sentence……….and you’re wondering if it’s really an SOS signal………..from the author……..under the guise of writing……….

    Your write Lexi………………thats realy anoyin’…………………….. LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • #543208

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    hvnlykarma – 2009-09-03 6:12 PM Well…since you asked… It bugs me when “the” is consistantly spelled “teh”. 😀

    I do that all “teh” time, and I’m afraid folks will just have to live with it.  Good word processors have spolied me because they automatically correct this typo, and many others, as well.  I also frequently hit the “;” key when I mean to hit the ” ‘ ” key, and my word processor corrects this, too.
    You’d think the internet would catch up with the technology of a word processor, but it hasn’t yet.
  • #543209

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    Choppy writing annoys me more than anything else. Good writing flows, bad writing is always choppy.

  • #543210

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    Hopelessly hopeful – 2009-09-03 6:34 PM A pet peeve of mine is the misuse of “your” and “you’re.” But if you want to know what annoys me about someone’s personal style, I’d have to say that I hate the use of “then” when listing off a sequence of actions. I.E. “this happened, then he did this, then this.” To me, it seems like nothing more or less than author intrusion when they use that word.

    It bothers me when writers do not use “then” for a sequence of actions.  It isn’t authorial intrusion, it’s good grammar.  “And” alone means you’re doing two things simultaneously.  “And then” means you do one thing first, and then do a second.  “Walking and juggling” means you’re doing both at the same time.  “Walked and then juggled” means you stopped walking before you started juggling.
    So unless the events are all being done at the same time, “then” is called for.
  • #543211

    pkubin
    Participant

    Jamesaritchie – 2009-09-04 11:54 AM

    Hopelessly hopeful – 2009-09-03 6:34 PM A pet peeve of mine is the misuse of “your” and “you’re.” But if you want to know what annoys me about someone’s personal style, I’d have to say that I hate the use of “then” when listing off a sequence of actions. I.E. “this happened, then he did this, then this.” To me, it seems like nothing more or less than author intrusion when they use that word.

    It bothers me when writers do not use “then” for a sequence of actions.  It isn’t authorial intrusion, it’s good grammar.  “And” alone means you’re doing two things simultaneously.  “And then” means you do one thing first, and then do a second.  “Walking and juggling” means you’re doing both at the same time.  “Walked and then juggled” means you stopped walking before you started juggling.
    So unless the events are all being done at the same time, “then” is called for.

    *shrugs* To each his own.  I’ve read many books that were written very well by authors who refrained from the use of “then” in a sequence of actions and their point came across very clearly.  This particular style appeals to me. 

    Although, I do have to disagree with you about “and” always signifying a simultaneous action.  For example, if you were to read, “he jumped off the stairs and ran to the door,” you would not think that he simultaneously jumped and ran.  You would know that the jumping came before the running.

    If your particular style uses “then” in a sequence of actions, then I didn’t mean to offend. 🙂

  • #543212

    jennifernobile
    Participant

    then their are people who post blank messages. They claim to be experts in grammer but they dont know the pronounciation of certian words an scroomup. Its a sin fore such people to mass a cur the langwage.

    Your’s truely,

  • #543213

    robfp
    Participant

    1. “it’s” for “its” (or even the rank abomination “its'”) to show possession

    2. apostrophes on mailboxes (“The Smith’s”. The Smith’s what – mailbox? Obvious lack of education?)

    3. prologues and endless exposition

    4. enumerated lists

    5.html quirks that turn a right parenthesis into an emoticon and add random html language in my posts

     

  • #543214

    Pseudonymphette
    Participant

    A sign in front of a house that I pass everyday on the way to work reads: Lawn Mower’s Repair.
    He’s let the Mower take over the business!

  • #543215

    janicekatz
    Participant

    People who think they’re perfect and don’t make mistakes.

  • #543216

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    Hopelessly hopeful – 2009-09-04 1:15 PM

    Jamesaritchie – 2009-09-04 11:54 AM

    Hopelessly hopeful – 2009-09-03 6:34 PM A pet peeve of mine is the misuse of “your” and “you’re.” But if you want to know what annoys me about someone’s personal style, I’d have to say that I hate the use of “then” when listing off a sequence of actions. I.E. “this happened, then he did this, then this.” To me, it seems like nothing more or less than author intrusion when they use that word.

    It bothers me when writers do not use “then” for a sequence of actions.  It isn’t authorial intrusion, it’s good grammar.  “And” alone means you’re doing two things simultaneously.  “And then” means you do one thing first, and then do a second.  “Walking and juggling” means you’re doing both at the same time.  “Walked and then juggled” means you stopped walking before you started juggling.
    So unless the events are all being done at the same time, “then” is called for.

     

     

    *shrugs* To each his own.  I’ve read many books that were written very well by authors who refrained from the use of “then” in a sequence of actions and their point came across very clearly.  This particular style appeals to me. 

    Although, I do have to disagree with you about “and” always signifying a simultaneous action.  For example, if you were to read, “he jumped off the stairs and ran to the door,” you would not think that he simultaneously jumped and ran.  You would know that the jumping came before the running.

    If your particular style uses “then” in a sequence of actions, then I didn’t mean to offend. 🙂

    No, I wouldn’t think you jumped and ran out teh door at the same time because it’s impossible to do both those things at once.  Nevertheless, that’s what you;re saying, and if you list a series of events that can be done at the same time, I’m going to assume they are being done at teh same time if teh writer says they are, and that’s just what “and” alone does.  It’s never a good idea to write with the excuse “they know what I mean.”
    It isn’t about agreement or disagreement.  That’s what “and” means by the rules of grammar.  Sure, many writers ignore the rule at times, but usually only when the meaning is clear, I do sometimes, as well.   But using “and then” is still proper grammar, and has nothing to do with style. 
    “Authorial intrusion” simply has nothing to do with it, either way.
  • #543217

    GafRoolfpep
    Participant

    The it’s, its thing bothers me when used incorrectly, although I’m sure I’ve done that before. I recently heard most agents will not proceed past page one of a manuscript if they see that used improperly.

    Here’s one I particularly enjoyed: Fresh Shimp for sale. This sign blazed through a whole summer and I had to finally stop and grab some of that shimp. Yum! 🙂

    Cheers,
    Drain
    http://www.dorrainedarden.com
    Blogging@Free Ice Cream

  • #543218

    superman13
    Participant

    kaymoon – 2009-09-05 1:34 PM The it’s, its thing bothers me when used incorrectly, although I’m sure I’ve done that before. I recently heard most agents will not proceed past page one of a manuscript if they see that used improperly.

    Here’s one I particularly enjoyed: Fresh Shimp for sale. This sign blazed through a whole summer and I had to finally stop and grab some of that shimp. Yum! 🙂

    Cheers,
    Drain
    http://www.dorrainedarden.com
    Blogging@Free Ice Cream

     

    Actually, I think it is spelled “shimp” in Texas, isn’t it?  😉

  • #543219

    janicekatz
    Participant

    I think there needs to be a distinction drawn between typos or people working too quickly and out and out stupidity. Years ago, I had a moron for a boss who could barely put a sentence together on paper and couldn’t spell as well as my eight year old daughter does now. Yet, I answered to him. Pathetic.
    By the way, a local Burger King was advertising one of their Angus burgers on their sign out front. Naturally, one of the employees spelled it “anus”. Was it a mistake or an example of teenage humor? I found it somewhat amusing.

  • #543220

    superman13
    Participant

    rjcload – 2009-09-05 1:55 PM I think there needs to be a distinction drawn between typos or people working too quickly and out and out stupidity. Years ago, I had a moron for a boss who could barely put a sentence together on paper and couldn’t spell as well as my eight year old daughter does now. Yet, I answered to him. Pathetic. By the way, a local Burger King was advertising one of their Angus burgers on their sign out front. Naturally, one of the employees spelled it “anus”. Was it a mistake or an example of teenage humor? I found it somewhat amusing.

     I’ll bet it was served between two buns, wasn’t it?

  • #543221

    GafRoolfpep
    Participant

    Cheap,

    Texans are very tolerant of errors, grammatical and otherwise. Its, whoops, it’s what got this one to stop, and was the best shimp I ever et.

    Cheers,
    Drain
    http://www.dorrainedarden.com
    Blogging@Free Ice Cream

  • #543222

    janicekatz
    Participant

    Ultimate Cheapskate – 2009-09-05 2:06 PM

    rjcload – 2009-09-05 1:55 PM I think there needs to be a distinction drawn between typos or people working too quickly and out and out stupidity. Years ago, I had a moron for a boss who could barely put a sentence together on paper and couldn’t spell as well as my eight year old daughter does now. Yet, I answered to him. Pathetic. By the way, a local Burger King was advertising one of their Angus burgers on their sign out front. Naturally, one of the employees spelled it “anus”. Was it a mistake or an example of teenage humor? I found it somewhat amusing.

     I’ll bet it was served between two buns, wasn’t it?

    Good one!

  • #543223

    Swamproot
    Participant

    onlysimplepages – 2009-09-03 9:39 PM LOL. You guys are hilarious! This isn’t really a style of writing, more of a grammar mistake. But tons of people in a mom’s group I’m in confuse “than” with “then” and I don’t understand how? Don’t we learn that in 3rd grade?

     

    Along this line, when affect/effect are used incorrectly in office memos on a regular basis.  I find that annoying.

  • #543224

    JinnM
    Participant

    I was recently text-dating someone before I was to meet them on a trip ( a setup by a friend). She LOL’ed constantly, and I gotta say, I held it against her. An occasional LMAO, however, is not bad.

  • #543225

    urworstnitemare
    Participant

    OK? Like, you know what I mean? Like, irregardless of weather its important, you still gotta do it, you know? You gotta admit you do do it, right? I mean, c’mon, you know?

     

  • #543226

    pkubin
    Participant

    Jamesaritchie – 2009-09-05 12:11 PM

    No, I wouldn’t think you jumped and ran out teh door at the same time because it’s impossible to do both those things at once.  Nevertheless, that’s what you;re saying, and if you list a series of events that can be done at the same time, I’m going to assume they are being done at teh same time if teh writer says they are, and that’s just what “and” alone does.  It’s never a good idea to write with the excuse “they know what I mean.”
    It isn’t about agreement or disagreement.  That’s what “and” means by the rules of grammar.  Sure, many writers ignore the rule at times, but usually only when the meaning is clear, I do sometimes, as well.   But using “and then” is still proper grammar, and has nothing to do with style. 
    “Authorial intrusion” simply has nothing to do with it, either way.

    [/QUOTE]

    Precisely.  When it is utterly impossible for two things to be done simultaneously, and the author still uses “and then,” I feel they are intruding to the point of thinking that the reader is an idiot.  As in, “just in case you didn’t know that a person cannot run and jump simultaneously, I’m going to add this extra word to make sure you get it.”  It may not be improper grammar, but it is annoying none-the-less.  And it is possible to list a sequence of actions that could possibly be done simultaneously without using “and” or “then.”  This is what I prefer to read.  And honestly, to do it that way requires a bit more thinking and artistry. 

  • #543227

    Doripap
    Participant

    I cannot stand overly purple prose. I love a good description,but some take it too far. I want to say,GOOD LORD,get on with it.

  • #543228

    janicekatz
    Participant

    I’d like to remind everyone here that this is a writing forum for a reason. It’s heavily populated by writers. Many of you write for a living and quite a few, like myself, write as a hobby. The pros should be 99.9% perfect as far as grammar is concerned with the amateurs at least above what would be considered average. People who do not write for a living or have any interest in doing so do not hold themselves to the same standard. I’m the purchasing manager for a company that fixes railcars. The guys in my shop more than likely don’t read and, I can assure you, they don’t write.
    Many of the examples given above are blatant bastardizations of our language to be sure. The misuse of apostrophes stands out for me. Some, however, such as the affect/effect example are purely memorization and, I feel, a bit more tolerable. Why do I say that? Because I’ll admit that I’m one of the knot heads who has to refer to his grammar guide in an effort to avoid such mistakes. Hey, at least I’m trying. I haven’t written regularly in a very long time and this leads me to believe that one can simply get a bit rusty. I’m convinced emails and instant messages can make one a bit lazy which leads to bad habits. By the way, why is it always recommended that writers have a grammar guide close at hand? Writers are impervious to making mistakes, are they not?
    I don’t know what other sites the rest of you visit but I have a couple that are frequented by young people. How can one write a thirty line paragraph without one punctuation mark or one capital letter? Now THAT’S unacceptable. That’s the same kid who’s going to graduate college and not going to be able to name the Axis powers in World War 2. That’s one of MY biggest pet peeves.

  • #543229

    Peter Keen
    Participant

    I hate redundancy. Here’s an example from a book I am currently reading; ” …I was once again filled with those all-too-familiar feelings of fear and panic. I was familiar with panic and fear. I knew the feeling of being terrified.” – A Brother’s Journey
    Yes, I get it. You were panicked and afraid, isn’t it enough to say it just once? Gah! Drives me nuts!

  • #543230

    ljb1947
    Participant

    I wouldn’t think you jumped and ran out teh door at the same time because it’s impossible to do both those things at once. Nevertheless, that’s what you;re saying, and if you list a series of events that can be done at the same time, I’m going to assume they are being done at teh same time if teh writer says they are, and that’s just what “and” alone does. .

    James you are wrong. ‘And’ does not imply necessary simultaneity. Not only is it not necessary to use ‘then’ is unneeded and should be edited out.

    You may think you are using proper grammar by using and in every sentence, but you are not. A number of things indicate simultaneous action. Gerunds do. ‘While’ does. ‘As’ does. ‘And’ does not necessarily.

    I have never had an editor say, “OMG! You can’t say that because it would be simultaneous.” Because it isn’t. My first comment from an editor, however, was to take out redundant thens.

    If ‘and’ meant actions were simultaneous, it would be incorrect to say “he walked across the room and went out the door.” (which it is not) just as it is incorrect to say “Walking across the room, he went out the door” because the gerund always means the actions are simultaneous and thus the sentence doesn’t even make sense.

    Actions linked by ‘and’ may or may not be simultaneous. The ‘and’ does not indicate that they are or are not one way or the other. And is simply a conjunction that sticks parts of sentences together. It does not indicate anything about whether the actions are simultaneous or not.

    Constantly sticking in “then” when obviously one action follows another because you are telling me they did is another pet peeve. Do not tell me “he walked across the room and then went out the door” as though I am incapable of figuring it out.

    Edit: My preference for simultaneous actions is to us a construction that can ONLY mean simultaneous action. Most actions aren’t. By the way, there is no reason to avoid using ‘and’ any more than any other word in the English language. However, I have a strong preference for avoiding ‘then’ simply because I know so many editors who dislike it.

  • #543231

    chesterwoolah
    Participant

    NMMillan – 2009-09-06 1:42 AM

    I hate redundancy. Here’s an example from a book I am currently reading; ” …I was once again filled with those all-too-familiar feelings of fear and panic. I was familiar with panic and fear. I knew the feeling of being terrified.” – A Brother’s Journey

    LOL. Makes me want to bang my head against the wall.

  • #543232

    rockersmist
    Participant

    you guys are high-larious.

    Apostrophes and possessives–er, that is, people who don’t know the difference–are my bedevilment.

    But then, other times it’s amusing. Like at the doughnut shop I lived near called Yum’s Donut. I always wondered: Do they sell just one doughnut? It must be a darn good doughnut–no wonder there’s always a line out the door.

  • #543233

    jIPPity
    Participant

    jrtomlin

    James you are wrong. ‘And’ does not imply necessary simultaneity. Not only is it not necessary to use ‘then’ is unneeded and should be edited out.

    I agree with Jeanne on this one. “And” does not necessarily imply simultaneity. It may, of course, but just as often (maybe more often) it indicates successive actions.

    “He jumped in the car and drove off.” Is this sentence incorrect? Of course not. It indicates successive actions, and no reader would be confused by it. And to rewrite it as “He jumped in the car and then drove off,” while not incorrect, is less effective writing. There’s no reason to insert “then.”

    The one thing you don’t want to do in such a sentence is put a comma before the “and.” “He jumped in the car, and drove off” is poor because now the second clause lacks a subject.

    –Warren

  • #543234

    mlghaley
    Participant

    I just remembered one that I saw while driving home last week. I was behind a service van at a red light. Their logo was on the back of the van: “Honey-do Service – No job to small, No job to tuff” Arg! The spelling of ‘tuff’ for ‘tough’ was bad enough, but to misspell the word “too”? That about killed me. But what pulled me out of the cringe, and made me Laugh Out Loud, (couldn’t resist), was the fact that the van’s passenger window was covered with a trash bag duct taped to the frame. Bless his heart, the driver may have been on his way to have the window repaired, but if a “fix-it-all” business can’t even fix their own broken window, never mind spell correctly, why would I want to hire them?

  • #543235

    mlghaley
    Participant

    I just remembered one that I saw while driving home last week. I was behind a service van at a red light. Their logo was on the back of the van: “Honey-do Service – No job to small, No job to tuff” Arg! The spelling of ‘tuff’ for ‘tough’ was bad enough, but to misspell the word “too”? That about killed me. But what pulled me out of the cringe, and made me Laugh Out Loud, (couldn’t resist), was the fact that the van’s passenger window was covered with a trash bag duct taped to the frame. Bless his heart, the driver may have been on his way to have the window repaired, but if a “fix-it-all” business can’t even fix their own broken window, never mind spell correctly, why would I want to hire them?

  • #543236

    jshashaty
    Participant

    I recently finished reading a murder mystery where the vp character listed full names of hundreds of people–everyone she saw and some she didn’t.  In the hardware store, for instance, she named other customers who said nothing and had nothing to do with the story.  Often the  person’s history would be told, with full names of kin.  If that weren’t enough, those with speaking roles retorted, answered, replied, called, shouted, whispered, asked, commanded, murmured, snapped, responded, snapped, uttered, exclaimed, mused, allowed, declared, warned, asserted, interrupted,  begged, demanded, added, offered, remarked, urged, cried–yes, I’m sitting here copying all this out of the book.  There were few “said’s” and most were tagged.  This author has published many books in a series.  And if you wonder why I read the whole thing, I was overcome by incredulity. 

  • #543237

    HabeToore
    Participant

    Lexi – 2009-09-04 6:09 AM

    The unending ellipsis………….especially when it’s not even appropriate for the sentence……….and you’re wondering if it’s really an SOS signal………..from the author……..under the guise of writing……….

    Oops…that’s me!

    It’s where the ‘like’ is supposed to go…I’m trying to break myself of the habit.

     

  • #543238

    HabeToore
    Participant

    Lexi – 2009-09-04 6:09 AM

    The unending ellipsis………….especially when it’s not even appropriate for the sentence……….and you’re wondering if it’s really an SOS signal………..from the author……..under the guise of writing……….

    Oops…that’s me!

    It’s where the ‘like’ is supposed to go…I’m trying to break myself of the habit.

     

  • #543239

    robfp
    Participant

    “He jumped in the car, and drove off” is poor because now the second clause lacks a subject. –Warren

    Forgive me, Warren, but it should be “He jumped INTO the car.” Just another one of my peeves!

  • #543240

    jIPPity
    Participant

    pls – 2009-09-08 8:02 AM

    “He jumped in the car, and drove off” is poor because now the second clause lacks a subject. –Warren

    Forgive me, Warren, but it should be “He jumped INTO the car.” Just another one of my peeves!

    I understand your peeve, and usually I do write “into” in such a case. However, my online dictionary gives as a second definition of “in”:

    “expressing motion with the result that something ends up surrounded by or within something else.”

    And it gives as an example:

    “He got in his car and drove off.”

    –Warren

  • #543241

    maineport
    Participant

    The constant misuse of apostrophe’s! 🙂

  • #543242

    barnettwg
    Participant

    My biggest peeve is when you can hear someone yelling through their writing., but they haven’t written anything that should be yelled about. I can’t really explain it… It’s mostly seen on anonymous comments on blogs or review sites. Their sentences stream on with no rhyme or reason…gah!

  • #543243

    angel_smile
    Participant

    Nothing annoys me more than when I personally make careless mistakes – like using the wrong ‘your’ or writing ‘diffuse’ when I mean ‘defuse’ or ‘effect’ when I mean ‘affect.’ I hate that. Nothing annoys me more than my own errors. There is nothing that anyone could ever write that could possibly annoy me more than my own shortcomings. Especially when I know better and/or when I think I’m being careful. I cringe just thinking about it. However, I do find text/IM jargon mildly irritating.

  • #543244

    Edward
    Participant

    Hopelessly hopeful – 2009-09-05 6:56 PM

    Jamesaritchie – 2009-09-05 12:11 PM

    No, I wouldn’t think you jumped and ran out teh door at the same time because it’s impossible to do both those things at once.  Nevertheless, that’s what you;re saying, and if you list a series of events that can be done at the same time, I’m going to assume they are being done at teh same time if teh writer says they are, and that’s just what “and” alone does.  It’s never a good idea to write with the excuse “they know what I mean.”
    It isn’t about agreement or disagreement.  That’s what “and” means by the rules of grammar.  Sure, many writers ignore the rule at times, but usually only when the meaning is clear, I do sometimes, as well.   But using “and then” is still proper grammar, and has nothing to do with style. 
    “Authorial intrusion” simply has nothing to do with it, either way.

    Precisely.  When it is utterly impossible for two things to be done simultaneously, and the author still uses “and then,” I feel they are intruding to the point of thinking that the reader is an idiot.  As in, “just in case you didn’t know that a person cannot run and jump simultaneously, I’m going to add this extra word to make sure you get it.”  It may not be improper grammar, but it is annoying none-the-less.  And it is possible to list a sequence of actions that could possibly be done simultaneously without using “and” or “then.”  This is what I prefer to read.  And honestly, to do it that way requires a bit more thinking and artistry. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Why use “and then”? Would it not be proper to just use “then”?

    The man jumped into the car, then slammed his foot on the gas.

  • #543245

    wk32
    Participant

     

    Are you referring to one that just responses to a post? Or when they have posted a story up for critique? I’m not always going back to fix my grammar mistakes when I’m responding to someone else’s post.

    Annoying to me is throwing insults in some of the forums, because they cannot defend their viewpoint properly.

     

     

  • #543246

    mcred
    Participant

    I can’t stand the word “gotten”. I don’t know why but it sends me into a tizzy. Especially when a news reporter uses the word on t.v., reading it is bad enough.

    Gotten.

    Blarrrgh.

    /You know I am double checking for typos on this post – LOLOLOL1111!!!!!!

  • #543247

    Spirited 1
    Participant

    Hopelessly hopeful – 2009-09-03 7:34 PM A pet peeve of mine is the misuse of “your” and “you’re.” But if you want to know what annoys me about someone’s personal style, I’d have to say that I hate the use of “then” when listing off a sequence of actions. I.E. “this happened, then he did this, then this.” To me, it seems like nothing more or less than author intrusion when they use that word.

    Author intrusion is when a story screeches to a halt to explain something.  It is like a commercial announcement.  And I don’t just mean the beginner mistake of explaining rather than telling the story.  Sometimes it isn’t so obvious (but still annoying), like “She ran to the kitchen where she spent the morning using the butcher knife to cut up the roast,” and I think, “Oh, how convenient!”  Then, by itself, does not bother me so much.

    -Michael

  • #543248

    fotojunkie
    Participant

    Signs advertising “old fashion hamburgers”


     

  • #543249

    foghorn
    Participant

    Here comes my years of training to spell foreign languages correctly. (…….. for Lexi) Incorrect spelling by people who should know better (writers) annoys me online. My French and Spanish teachers/professors have drilled correct spelling into me, but if I’m a writer, I should know how to spell. A computer doesn’t catch everything and sometimes it makes wrong suggestions.

    When I read, I get annoyed by authors who repeat themselves. I get that she’s worried. Her dialogue told me that. Please don’t describe that again. Instead, move on to something a lot more exciting in the narrative.

  • #543250

    Maizie
    Participant

    I’m not a big fan of excessive descriptions. If the writer goes on and on trying to describe something, I often find myself skipping over sentences, paragraphs, and sometimes entire pages just to get back to the plot.

  • #543251

    JinnM
    Participant

    Certain writers have to give you a page-long description of each character as they enter the story. It’ like they’re each handing you a resume as they walk in the door;-)

    “Hi, I’m Tracy. I’ll be one of your characters this evening. Would you like anything from the bar?”

  • #543252

    superman13
    Participant

     A new poll shows that “whatever” is now the most annoying word.  See:

    http://news.aol.com/article/whatever-tops-most-annoying-word-poll/708056?icid=main|main|dl1|link6|http%3A%2F%2Fnews.aol.com%2Farticle%2Fwhatever-tops-most-annoying-word-poll%2F708056

  • #543253

    janicekatz
    Participant

    YouHaveMyWords – 2009-10-05 10:44 AM

    I’m not a big fan of excessive descriptions. If the writer goes on and on trying to describe something, I often find myself skipping over sentences, paragraphs, and sometimes entire pages just to get back to the plot.

    Agreed. Not to mention, one doesn’t have to weigh down several consecutive pages with description either. I prefer writers who use description when necessary and in a subtle fashion that doesn’t pull me away from the plot for too long or hopefully not at all. Descriptive prose that’s interwoven within the action suits my tastes.

  • #543254

    kajufa
    Participant

    novembergal – 2009-09-03 7:41 PM I’ve spent most of the last week reading court transcripts, summarizing testimony for a law firm, so what’s annoying me right now isn’t how some people write, but how they talk. Maybe it’s worse seeing their words in written form. One such annoyance is the overuse of the word LIKE. Some examples from a supposedly well-educated, 40+ year old female witness: there was like no dishes; there’s like nothing on the counter; I’m like you’re kidding; one bikini is like really her favorite; It was like what was that?; I’m like, I don’t want to do this, and then I’m like okay. That is so like really annoying. 🙁

    Gena, I can relate to this.  You get a lot of insight into other people when reading deposition transcripts.

    My pet peeve is all lowercase, or lowercase when capitals should be used, in internet communication. I also do not like the excessive use of adverbs in writing, or using “and” to connect two complete sentences which have no real connection.

  • #543255

    ronaghan
    Participant

    Ultimate Cheapskate, that’s an excellent article about the word ‘whatever’. It was really funny.
    One saying that’s always annoyed me is the phrase ‘No problem.’ When people substitute this phrase in place of saying ‘your welcome’, that bothers me somewhat. But for some reason, the same saying(‘no problem’), sounds worse in Spanish ‘de nada.'(?spelling) I have a two year old, who watches Dora the Explorer and they say ‘de nada’ all the time. I just think it would be to teach the kids a better way to be polite by saying’Your welcome.’
    Alexis

  • #543256

    markarice
    Participant

    When reading novels: Excessive description of unimportant locations. I don’t need to know the color of the table the protagonist is having her dinner on, really.
    Online: txt sp34k.

  • #543257

    Mekskinalooli
    Participant

    WOW! Several things will send me into a fiery rage: Misspellings, bad grammer, excessive use of exclamation points and dots, not capitalizing things that should be (i.e. ‘I’, ‘proper names’, cities and states). Especially when talking to college students who tell me they’re English majors. WTF?! I mean, come on. They don’t know the difference between ‘there, their and they’re’, ‘to, too and two’. I’m constantly seeing, “I have to much time” or “I’m going too go, two.” Oh, please! English major my arse.

    And speaking of businesses that allow their teenaged employees to change the sign in front…Arby’s here apparently needed workers. The boy changed the sign out front. It said ‘Now hiring all sh*ts’ instead of ‘Now hiring all shifts’. Made me chuckle after I got over my ‘English major’ attitude.

  • #543258

    jennifernobile
    Participant

    A tiny thing: people who reveal that they are listeners and not readers by writing “all of the sudden” instead of “all of a sudden.” What the heck is a sudden anyway? And then there are the folk who insist on “anyways.”

    A nearby, long-standing motel recently put up a new sign. I’m sure 100s of people have pointed out the error, but it continues as The Wilkie’s Motel. Someday I’ll satisfy a decades-long urge by going in and demanding to talk to the Wilkie.

  • #543259

    foghorn
    Participant

    Jaiquithe – 2009-10-08 2:23 PM

    And speaking of businesses that allow their teenaged employees to change the sign in front…Arby’s here apparently needed workers. The boy changed the sign out front. It said ‘Now hiring all sh*ts’ instead of ‘Now hiring all shifts’. Made me chuckle after I got over my ‘English major’ attitude.

    That’s hilarious! And it might apply for some potential employees.

  • #543260

    janicekatz
    Participant

    Lex – 2009-10-08 2:21 PM

    Ultimate Cheapskate, that’s an excellent article about the word ‘whatever’. It was really funny.
    One saying that’s always annoyed me is the phrase ‘No problem.’ When people substitute this phrase in place of saying ‘your welcome’, that bothers me somewhat. But for some reason, the same saying(‘no problem’), sounds worse in Spanish ‘de nada.'(?spelling) I have a two year old, who watches Dora the Explorer and they say ‘de nada’ all the time. I just think it would be to teach the kids a better way to be polite by saying’Your welcome.’
    Alexis

    My Spanish teacher, so many years ago, translated de nada as “it’s nothing.” In her opinion, “it’s nothing” was far less arrogant and more polite than “you’re welcome.” “You’re welcome” seems to exult the person being thanked, at least according to my teacher. “It’s nothing” leaves the focus on the recipient of the favor, kind words, etc..

  • #543261

    janicekatz
    Participant

    Sascha – 2009-10-08 2:35 PM

    When reading novels: Excessive description of unimportant locations. I don’t need to know the color of the table the protagonist is having her dinner on, really.
    Online: txt sp34k.

    Stephen King addresses the issue of being over descriptive in his book On Writing. The color of the table cloth may or may not be important. For me, the real issue is does the author have to tell me everything thereby squelching my own imagination? How about just telling me the basics and letting me fill in the minute details. Allowing me to furnish the kitchen with my own imagination would draw me in much further and the same goes for character description.

  • #543262

    janicekatz
    Participant

    Sascha – 2009-10-08 2:35 PM

    When reading novels: Excessive description of unimportant locations. I don’t need to know the color of the table the protagonist is having her dinner on, really.
    Online: txt sp34k.

    Stephen King addresses the issue of being over descriptive in his book On Writing. The color of the table cloth may or may not be important. For me, the real issue is does the author have to tell me everything thereby squelching my own imagination? How about just telling me the basics and letting me fill in the minute details. Allowing me to furnish the kitchen with my own imagination would draw me in much further and the same goes for character description.

  • #543263

    markarice
    Participant

    rjcload – 2009-10-09 12:25 AM
    Stephen King addresses the issue of being over descriptive in his book On Writing. The color of the table cloth may or may not be important. For me, the real issue is does the author have to tell me everything thereby squelching my own imagination? How about just telling me the basics and letting me fill in the minute details. Allowing me to furnish the kitchen with my own imagination would draw me in much further and the same goes for character description.

    That’s right, of course. If the furniture is somewhat important to the story, by all means, tell me. But I have read too many novels where the author is giving me a full page of description of the entire place a scene is playing in, obviously serving no other purpose than filling a page. Other than having a weak plot to begin with (I don’t think anything can beat the annoyance of a story that never should have been written), over-description is the single biggest thing that can annoy me as a reader. It keeps the story from moving on and is killing my imagination.

  • #543264

    janicekatz
    Participant

    Sascha – 2009-10-09 2:32 AM

    rjcload – 2009-10-09 12:25 AM
    Stephen King addresses the issue of being over descriptive in his book On Writing. The color of the table cloth may or may not be important. For me, the real issue is does the author have to tell me everything thereby squelching my own imagination? How about just telling me the basics and letting me fill in the minute details. Allowing me to furnish the kitchen with my own imagination would draw me in much further and the same goes for character description.

    That’s right, of course. If the furniture is somewhat important to the story, by all means, tell me. But I have read too many novels where the author is giving me a full page of description of the entire place a scene is playing in, obviously serving no other purpose than filling a page. Other than having a weak plot to begin with (I don’t think anything can beat the annoyance of a story that never should have been written), over-description is the single biggest thing that can annoy me as a reader. It keeps the story from moving on and is killing my imagination.

    As a youngster, I read virtually the entire Hardy Boys series. The books were aimed at my age at the time and served to fire up my imagination and a lifelong love of reading. I must say, however, that there are elements of the writing that stick out in my mind as being less than stellar. When the young super sleuths sat down to breakfast, I ended up learning EVERYTHING about what they ate. What kind of eggs were they? It was there. Were the yolks hard or runny and did the eggs have the little black specks that deem them inedible, at least by my kids? It was there. Was it wheat toast or white? You get the picture. Nothing was left to the imagination and I’m no longer sure that was a good thing. If I read something like that now I would probably respond with a “Who gives a hoot?” Well, maybe not “hoot” but I have to keep this clean.

      I have a question for the more experienced writers here. Is all of that description acceptable for a YA book? Are the rules different from what would be expected for an adult novel?

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