James, just was wondering…

Home Forums Writer’s Digest Forum Writers’ Block Party James, just was wondering…

This topic contains 19 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  Mikala Engel 11 years, 12 months ago.

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  • #317198
  • #390525

    How many PM do you have in your box here?  Must be about full by now…

    I’m guessing you don’t check them.  So…I guess I just have to make my “thank you” public.

    Thanks, for all of your know-how, advice and support.  You are a blessing to the forums for all that you do.

    Here…some very fine wine and chocolate – your choice.  Or pencils if you prefer.

    Really, thanks for spending your time here and helping so many of us.  You are a mentor to many and that should make those walks in the country so much more fulfilling.

    Karen

  • #390526

    megsouza
    Participant

    Let me add a big, “Amen, Sistah” to your words, Karen!

    Thanks, James!!!  You are often the comfort in a storm.

  • #390527

    lesawrites
    Participant

    And let me third that. Thank you, James – you are a fount of wisdom and inspiration. Thanks for putting up with all of us, guiding us gently (and not so) to becoming better writers…. Linda

  • #390528

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    Wow, thanks much to you.  I really do need to check the PMs, but there for a while I had such trouble getting in and out of there, probably the beta browser I was using,  that I gave up.  Since then I’ve pretty much forgotten they exist.

  • #390529

    Kim Campbell
    Participant

    Jamesaritchie – 2006-10-25 12:06 PM Wow, thanks much to you.  I really do need to check the PMs, but there for a while I had such trouble getting in and out of there, probably the beta browser I was using,  that I gave up.  Since then I’ve pretty much forgotten they exist.

    Check them out, James.

    I sent you some kudos on some of your work.  There are plenty of books floating around out there by James A Ritchie…

  • #390530

    Jamesaritchie – 2006-10-25 2:06 PM Wow, thanks much to you.  I really do need to check the PMs, but there for a while I had such trouble getting in and out of there, probably the beta browser I was using,  that I gave up.  Since then I’ve pretty much forgotten they exist.

    Ok, beta browser…hum.. I’ll accept…just thanks for being around.

  • #390531

    Jamesaritchie – 2006-10-25 2:06 PM Wow, thanks much to you.  I really do need to check the PMs, but there for a while I had such trouble getting in and out of there, probably the beta browser I was using,  that I gave up.  Since then I’ve pretty much forgotten they exist.

    Oh, come on…you are the kind to elude PM’s and for that, oh well…that is great, not a distraction from the world. 

    anyway…you are a man with many talents, one whose wise (but not beyond your means) not wiser than shakespere and what ever he tought was privy to his day…, which makes me ask…was Shakespere wise in his day or just another playwrite?

    Shakespere and the playwrites of that day fool me? 

  • #390532

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    KarenRankowitz – 2006-10-25 12:45 PM

    Jamesaritchie – 2006-10-25 2:06 PM Wow, thanks much to you.  I really do need to check the PMs, but there for a while I had such trouble getting in and out of there, probably the beta browser I was using,  that I gave up.  Since then I’ve pretty much forgotten they exist.

    Oh, come on…you are the kind to elude PM’s and for that, oh well…that is great, not a distraction from the world. 

    anyway…you are a man with many talents, one whose wise (but not beyond your means) not wiser than shakespere and what ever he tought was privy to his day…, which makes me ask…was Shakespere wise in his day or just another playwrite?

    Shakespere and the playwrites of that day fool me? 

    Well, I think it’s safe to say that Shakespeare was as wise then as now, but it’s also fair to say he wasn’t very appreciated by his peers, though even in his day, he was comsiderably more than just another playwright.

    He was looked down on by many because he wrote for the commoner, the drunken masses.  During most of his plays the cry “Burn the juniper” would arise at some point, and spread until someone began burning juniper boughs.  This to cover smell of vomit from the the drunks who couldn’t hold their booze until the play was over.

    He also claimed to have “Never blotted a line,” meaning everything he did was left at first draft stage.  When his players spread this brag around, Ben Jonson was asked what he thought about it, and he replied “Would that he had blotted a thousand.”

    Shakespeare had actually performed as an actor in one of Jonson’s plays, so this may have added to Jonson’s ire when Shakespeare started moving up teh ranks of the famous.

    Professional jealousy was common arund Shakespeare, partly because of his cuccess, and partly because several of his plays were simply rewrites of older plays and stories by other writers.  Not a bad thing, since Shakespeare rewrote them so well they became new again.

    And I will say that Shakespeare probably gave us the last word on the subject on wisdom.   “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”  “As You Like It”, Act 5 scene 1.
     

  • #390533

    kerrywood
    Blocked

    James…I think your greatest assest beyond sharing your knowledge with everyone, is you will stand up and speak your piece. Even when some don’t agree with you, (Me). You hold your ground, and don’t seem to hold any animosity against the person in opposition.

    You do a great service with your helpful advice.

    I hope you’ll continue to put up with the snotty brats (Me again) who might sometimes take on your opinions, and remember not to take it to heart. We just express our veiws differently.

    It takes alot of guts to give of yourself, and keep doing it, (We’ll still disagree on Mr Bush?) 🙂

    when you know there are some who just love a good debate.

    Keep sharing, you do much good for many. 

  • #390534

    Easley
    Participant

    Excuse me while I climb aboard this band wagon. I’m a little wide, but if everyone might shift just a bit to the side, I think there’d be sufficient room for me yet. James, you’ve helped me on several things already and probably didn’t even realize it. You’ve saved me a lot of time and effort that I’ve been able to devote to other endeavors. And your contributions are always professional and timely. Thanks for all you do.

    Piper

  • #390535

    Laurie Zupan
    Participant

    If James could charge royalties on the assignments I’ve received thanks to his initial help and prodding, I’d owe him most of what I’ve earned.

    That you continue to give help to others aspiring to a career in writing says a lot about your character, James!

  • #390536

    Jamesaritchie – 2006-10-25 5:09 PM

    KarenRankowitz – 2006-10-25 12:45 PM

    Jamesaritchie – 2006-10-25 2:06 PM Wow, thanks much to you.  I really do need to check the PMs, but there for a while I had such trouble getting in and out of there, probably the beta browser I was using,  that I gave up.  Since then I’ve pretty much forgotten they exist.

    Oh, come on…you are the kind to elude PM’s and for that, oh well…that is great, not a distraction from the world. 

    anyway…you are a man with many talents, one whose wise (but not beyond your means) not wiser than shakespere and what ever he tought was privy to his day…, which makes me ask…was Shakespere wise in his day or just another playwrite?

    Shakespere and the playwrites of that day fool me? 

    Well, I think it’s safe to say that Shakespeare was as wise then as now, but it’s also fair to say he wasn’t very appreciated by his peers, though even in his day, he was comsiderably more than just another playwright.

    He was looked down on by many because he wrote for the commoner, the drunken masses.  During most of his plays the cry “Burn the juniper” would arise at some point, and spread until someone began burning juniper boughs.  This to cover smell of vomit from the the drunks who couldn’t hold their booze until the play was over.

    He also claimed to have “Never blotted a line,” meaning everything he did was left at first draft stage.  When his players spread this brag around, Ben Jonson was asked what he thought about it, and he replied “Would that he had blotted a thousand.”

    Shakespeare had actually performed as an actor in one of Jonson’s plays, so this may have added to Jonson’s ire when Shakespeare started moving up teh ranks of the famous.

    Professional jealousy was common arund Shakespeare, partly because of his cuccess, and partly because several of his plays were simply rewrites of older plays and stories by other writers.  Not a bad thing, since Shakespeare rewrote them so well they became new again.

    And I will say that Shakespeare probably gave us the last word on the subject on wisdom.   “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”  “As You Like It”, Act 5 scene 1.
     

    See need I say more…you are no Shakespere…William was a fool in love with his words and not much else.

    James you have more than that.

  • #390537

    myappendixhurts
    Participant

    I sent you some kudos on some of your work.  There are plenty of books floating around out there by James A Ritchie…

    Holy cow, you ain’t kidding.  I did a search and was floored.

    I usually come away the wiser after reading one of James’ posts, but now I’m even more appreciative, seeing what a diligent and dedicated scribbler he is. 

    Is there still room on the bandwagon?  Scoot over Piper, you can put that lathe under your feet instead of taking up precious room on the bench. 

    –John

  • #390538

    Wait! Wait! Can I sqeeze in?

    James is “da bomb.”

    (I know, that’s so last year.)

    How about “groovy?” That’s timeless.

  • #390539

    Jamesaritchie – 2006-10-25 5:09 PM

    KarenRankowitz – 2006-10-25 12:45 PM

    Jamesaritchie – 2006-10-25 2:06 PM Wow, thanks much to you.  I really do need to check the PMs, but there for a while I had such trouble getting in and out of there, probably the beta browser I was using,  that I gave up.  Since then I’ve pretty much forgotten they exist.

    Oh, come on…you are the kind to elude PM’s and for that, oh well…that is great, not a distraction from the world. 

    anyway…you are a man with many talents, one whose wise (but not beyond your means) not wiser than shakespere and what ever he tought was privy to his day…, which makes me ask…was Shakespere wise in his day or just another playwrite?

    Shakespere and the playwrites of that day fool me? 

    Well, I think it’s safe to say that Shakespeare was as wise then as now, but it’s also fair to say he wasn’t very appreciated by his peers, though even in his day, he was comsiderably more than just another playwright.

    He was looked down on by many because he wrote for the commoner, the drunken masses.  During most of his plays the cry “Burn the juniper” would arise at some point, and spread until someone began burning juniper boughs.  This to cover smell of vomit from the the drunks who couldn’t hold their booze until the play was over.

    He also claimed to have “Never blotted a line,” meaning everything he did was left at first draft stage.  When his players spread this brag around, Ben Jonson was asked what he thought about it, and he replied “Would that he had blotted a thousand.”

    Shakespeare had actually performed as an actor in one of Jonson’s plays, so this may have added to Jonson’s ire when Shakespeare started moving up teh ranks of the famous.

    Professional jealousy was common arund Shakespeare, partly because of his cuccess, and partly because several of his plays were simply rewrites of older plays and stories by other writers.  Not a bad thing, since Shakespeare rewrote them so well they became new again.

    And I will say that Shakespeare probably gave us the last word on the subject on wisdom.   “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.”  “As You Like It”, Act 5 scene 1.
     

    James, I have to tell yoy in all honesty….Shakespere was a man that made acting, that made, the written word come to more than just letters on a page.  He was so much in his time that words cannot give credit to.

    So, Shakespere, here or there…do go on in your minds eye.

    oh, james…I have no idea why I picked shakesphere…just was something in my mind.

  • #390540

    rubyslippers
    Participant

    Wait for me – I want to get on, too!  James is like the keeper of the key, dropping golden nuggets of valuable info behind him.  Someone around here mentioned making ‘good writing advice’ folder with comments etc from people here.  I thought it was a great idea (sorry, can’t remember who said it) so I made one of my own.  James, they’re mostly all from you! Of course, you’re off now, and of course, I missed saying goodbye or gushing all the wonderful things you do for us all here, but hey, maybe you’ll look back in when you get settled. Oh well, suffice to say we luv you James!  And I’ll add my goodbye in here – hurry back – I can’t last too long without my personal advisor!

    Jill

  • #390541

    Dan Kimpel
    Participant

    James, for all of your good deeds I offer you permanent immunity from my wrath on the WD forums.
    Maria 😉

  • #390542

    Faergen
    Participant

    So, it’s official? James is a real person and not an electronic brain, sitting in a super-computer, in a secret cave, in an undisclosed location?

    HE’S ALIVE!!!!

    James, allow me the honor of buying you a beer.

  • #390543

    Mikala Engel
    Participant

    maria – 2006-10-26 6:34 AM James, for all of your good deeds I offer you permanent immunity from my wrath on the WD forums. Maria 😉

    Oh, no.  I don’t think I can function without the fear factor.

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