A Conundrum

This topic contains 3 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  jmurph65641 7 months ago.

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  • #346823

    Anonymous

    I am writing a sequel to a book that I self published. It was meant to be a stand alone but I received enough e-mail encouraging me to continue the story. There was an opening within the book that could allow for our hero to have escaped his situation while the heroine presumes he is dead. With that in mind, I began writing the sequel. Our hero is now living under a different name in another state. I write the hero under a different name. When the heroine from the first novel finds out in the sequel that the hero is alive but under another name… when do I or do I bother going back to the name of our hero in the first book?

    Back story: The name isn’t a stretch. In the first book his name is Chet. In the second, it’s Chuck. Chuck has disappeared to a small town in Montana where he is living with an old friend from high school who remembers our hero by his real name, which is Chuck. Chet was the name of our hero in the first book because that was his byline name and what he became known for. Hope that wasn’t confusing.

  • #655601

    Anonymous

    Brien Sz wrote:
    > I am writing a sequel to a book that I self published. It was meant to be
    > a stand alone but I received enough e-mail encouraging me to continue the
    > story. There was an opening within the book that could allow for our hero
    > to have escaped his situation while the heroine presumes he is dead. With
    > that in mind, I began writing the sequel. Our hero is now living under a
    > different name in another state. I write the hero under a different name.
    > When the heroine from the first novel finds out in the sequel that the hero
    > is alive but under another name… when do I or do I bother going back to
    > the name of our hero in the first book?
    >
    > Back story: The name isn’t a stretch. In the first book his name is Chet.
    > In the second, it’s Chuck. Chuck has disappeared to a small town in
    > Montana where he is living with an old friend from high school who
    > remembers our hero by his real name, which is Chuck. Chet was the name of
    > our hero in the first book because that was his byline name and what he
    > became known for. Hope that wasn’t confusing.
    When in doubt…

    Actually, you could introduce a little tension-breaking humor by having the characters themselves unsure of which name to use.

  • #655602

    Anonymous

    Agree with Rob – it’s actually not an unusual situation in novels. As long as the character’s “resurrection” isn’t too far-fetched, the decision/confusion between characters on which name to use is a natural one. Once THEY make the decision, you go with it (noting of course, that other characters will still use whatever name they know Chet/Chuck by until informed otherwise). 😉

  • #655603

    jmurph65641
    Participant

    Brien Sz wrote:
    > I am writing a sequel to a book that I self published. It was meant to be
    > a stand alone but I received enough e-mail encouraging me to continue the
    > story. There was an opening within the book that could allow for our hero
    > to have escaped his situation while the heroine presumes he is dead. With
    > that in mind, I began writing the sequel. Our hero is now living under a
    > different name in another state. I write the hero under a different name.
    > When the heroine from the first novel finds out in the sequel that the hero
    > is alive but under another name… when do I or do I bother going back to
    > the name of our hero in the first book?
    >
    > Back story: The name isn’t a stretch. In the first book his name is Chet.
    > In the second, it’s Chuck. Chuck has disappeared to a small town in
    > Montana where he is living with an old friend from high school who
    > remembers our hero by his real name, which is Chuck. Chet was the name of
    > our hero in the first book because that was his byline name and what he
    > became known for. Hope that wasn’t confusing.

    I would also take into account that (I’m assuming this is in the US?) if the character is in witness protection taking the name usage into consideration. If your doing something like this even his friend would have to be careful not to slip real names in public situations. As well as the hero himself, because people are creatures of habit and its hard to shift gears from being a Chet to a Chuck overnight. Its something the character would have to be consciously aware of and I would even guess a bit stressful too. If the WPA is involved more than likely the would place Chet in a new area all together and avoid old contacts for various reasons unless his old contact was of value for whatever reason.

    I don’t know if you saw the most recent Grand Theft auto but a character in there is perfect for the witness protection idea. How his identity gets blown out and such. Even how and “old friend” shows up on his door unannounced the unhinged Trevor meth head, killer, grand theft, etc… bad people. I haven’t played the game myself but my husband does and I have caught a lot here and there from watching or passively walking in on gaming.

    Just my 2 cents. 😀 I hope this help generate some ideas.

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