2017 Reading Challenge

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roda havet
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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby roda havet » Sun Sep 03, 2017 7:15 am

6. Until Tomorrow By Nancy Naigle :mrgreen:
[color=#00BF00]Dream to live, live to dream, and write to love, love to write![/color]

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DrG2
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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby DrG2 » Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:35 pm

49. The Art of Fielding, by Chad Harbach. ****1/2. At a baseball tournament a college catcher meets a shortstop who is so slick-fielding that the catcher gets him to enroll in his college. The catcher mentors the shortstop until he becomes a legitimate pro prospect, tying the record for most errorless games as a shortstop. Then things go to hell. The shortstop gets the "yips," unable to make easy throws, women get into the mix, the shortstop's roommate (an outfielder) gets into an affair with the (male) college president, friendships are broken. Things get better.

Excellent novel about male relationships.

50. Infernal Parade, by Clive Barker. A series of connected short stories. Half horror half fairy tale.

51. The Enchantress of Florence, by Salman Rushdie. **** Three young men of Florence go their own ways after they mature, their threads woven together is stories of fantasy (magical realism). The son of one enters the court of the Emperor of Hindustan and captivates him with his stories, including that he is the Emperor's uncle although he is younger and blond. The three men lead full, if not always happy lives.

Plenty to like. Humor. Clever stories. Told with a rather distant fairy tale-like narration. I liked it very much, but I couldn't read very big chunks of this at a time.

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DrG2
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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby DrG2 » Fri Oct 06, 2017 4:08 pm

52. The Land of Dreams, by Vidor Sundstol. I grabbed this off the library's new acquisition shelf and decided to read it based on its setting - - the North Shore of Lake Superior in Minnesota. It's a crime novel. A visiting Norwegian canoeist is killed, and everything points to his companion. There are two main POV here, the local Forest Service cop who found the body, and the Norwegian detective who comes to the states to investigate the murder (w/ the FBI). Although the F.S. cop is not involved in the investigation, he tries to solve both this murder and a case from 1892 where a native american went missing. His relatives are implicated in both murders.

pretty good. The author is a Norwegian who spent a couple years living in the area.

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DrG2
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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby DrG2 » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:07 pm

53. The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, by Steven King. *****. A nine-year-old girl gets separated from her mother and brother on a hike on the Appalachian Trail and walks out 1-2 weeks later. The thing that keeps her going is her attachment to Boston Red Sox pitcher Tom Gordon, a closer (pitches the last inning, usually) who gets a "save." There is the "God of the Lost," a creature that wants her demise; it's never 100% certain that it isn't just her hallucination, but the narrator leans to having it be a real thing.

King kept the tension going. Got a tad melodramatic at the end, but I loved it.

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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby Oldtimer » Fri Oct 13, 2017 8:55 am

[quote="DrG2"]53. The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, by Steven King. *****. A nine-year-old girl gets separated from her mother and brother on a hike on the Appalachian Trail and walks out 1-2 weeks later. The thing that keeps her going is her attachment to Boston Red Sox pitcher Tom Gordon, a closer (pitches the last inning, usually) who gets a "save." There is the "God of the Lost," a creature that wants her demise; it's never 100% certain that it isn't just her hallucination, but the narrator leans to having it be a real thing.

King kept the tension going. Got a tad melodramatic at the end, but I loved it.[/quote]

I loved this book, too. In my opinion, it's the best that Steven King wrote. Certainly far better than The Dome.

It's great to see you quietly reading away, up here in the Reading Challenge nook, DrG2. Don't you get a bit lonely, sometimes? I've half-a-dozen books to add to my list but just don't have the time to do that right now.
Read samples of my Martian series (by Dorothy Piper) and two romances (by Joni Havel) on Smashwords.
Hard copies of all are on Amazon.

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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby miketom » Fri Oct 20, 2017 1:56 am

Did some of my posts go poof? I could've sworn I had more than 4 books logged in, and they're from the 3rd page. :roll:
Formerly known as J T Hall and Lyn Carceo
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Brien Sz
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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby Brien Sz » Sun Oct 22, 2017 8:42 pm

Finished, The Salt Line - pretty good dystopian. Currently reading the latest bio on Ulysses S. Grant.

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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby DrG2 » Tue Oct 24, 2017 9:52 pm

54. The Food of the Gods, by Cassandra Khaw. ****1/2. It took me a while to get into this, but I really liked it by the time I got deep into the stories. Stories, because it's really 3 novellas instead of a novel. The MC is a chef for a pack of ghouls in Kuala Lumpur, his beloved is undead of some sort. That ends badly. He gets sent to London to cook for the Greek pantheon (don't ask me why they're in London). Violence happens. He somehow gets through (he has ghosts bound to his skin with tattoos, and that helps a lot).

It reads like a very young Chuck Pahlaniuk, if he decided to write a story like Gaiman's American Gods/Anansi Boys.
Very voicey.

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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby DrG2 » Sat Oct 28, 2017 5:04 pm

55. Leaving Las Vegas, by John O'Brien. ****1/2. The basis of the 1995 movie, starring Nicholas Cage and Elizabeth Shue. A prostitute who thinks she has her life in order realizes she doesn't when her former pimp rolls into town. An alcoholic who lost his job decides to drink himself to death, and figure Las Vegas is the place to be (24 hr. bars, etc.). They join up, have a relationship of sorts, and one of them has a resolution.

It was very good. If an alcoholic can drink as much as this guy did, it defies my understanding. Very dark.

The author killed himself two weeks after hearing it was going to be made into a movie. His only other novels were completed posthumously by his sister.

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Re: 2017 Reading Challenge

Postby DrG2 » Thu Nov 02, 2017 9:34 pm

56. A Short History of Tractors in Ukraine, by Marina Lewycka. ****. A woman who was born shortly before emigrating to the UK has to deal with her 84 y.o. father, who just married a 36 y.o. Ukrainian woman. Obviously she's in it for immigration status and whatever money she can get from him. There are plenty of flashbacks to when her family was still in Ukraine or Germany before and during WWII.
It's pretty good. It's marketed as humor, but it's not that funny.

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