prologue

What's going on in your writing world? Connect with the writing community here and talk about whatever's on your mind.
jackitaylor
Private First Class
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2017 9:24 am

prologue

Postby jackitaylor » Fri Sep 01, 2017 4:29 am

I have a secondary character who is not who he claims to be, it won't be revealed until the end. I am considering leading into that with a prologue, in the voice of that character. So throughout most of the book, the prologue will seem to have nothing to do with the content of the book, until the end when it will make sense. The prologue may be the only clue about the surprise at the end. The prologue also leads into a broader story arc, going past just this story. It's too early for me to say it will be a trilogy, but for now, it will be two books, i"m pretty sure. Does this sound like a good reason to prologue? would the prologue seeming to have nothing to do with that story just be too confusing?

User avatar
Oldtimer
Colonel
 
Posts: 2767
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2007 3:26 am
Location: New Hampshire

Re: prologue

Postby Oldtimer » Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:22 am

[quote="jackitaylor"]I The prologue may be the only clue about the surprise at the end. The prologue also leads into a broader story arc, going past just this story. It's too early for me to say it will be a trilogy, but for now, it will be two books, i"m pretty sure. Does this sound like a good reason to prologue? would the prologue seeming to have nothing to do with that story just be too confusing?[/quote]

Is the surprise going to come at the end of the first book, or at the end of the second/third part? I'd be tempted to repeat the prologue at the beginning of all books to keep the prediction in readers' minds. Will the first book be a stand-alone, or a stepping stone to the next part?
Read samples of my Martian series (by Dorothy Piper) and two romances (by Joni Havel) on Smashwords.
Hard copies of all are on Amazon.

jackitaylor
Private First Class
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2017 9:24 am

Re: prologue

Postby jackitaylor » Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:52 am

the surprise wil be at the end of the first book, but the character will be active in the second book, with his true identity known. the first book should be able to stand alone, as a completed story, although will end with a new problem that the main characters will have to work on, giving way to a sequel or continuation of the story.

User avatar
Brien Sz
Sergeant Major of the Army
 
Posts: 401
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 7:10 am

Re: prologue

Postby Brien Sz » Fri Sep 01, 2017 11:44 am

I'd watch that or come up with a better alternative. Agents generally don't like prologues because most writer's don't know how to utilize them. Secondly, some readers may skip the prologue because generally, you can, and not miss the point of the book.

When you secondary character, how would position that? For example, Dan Brown's bad guy (Angels & Demons and The Da Vinci Code) was one of the secondary characters in the novel.

jackitaylor
Private First Class
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2017 9:24 am

Re: prologue

Postby jackitaylor » Fri Sep 01, 2017 11:48 am

I don't understand your question, can you rephrase? Are you asking if it is a secondary character or if the character is a bad guy or a good guy?

User avatar
wdarcy
Major
 
Posts: 1702
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:13 pm

Re: prologue

Postby wdarcy » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:16 pm

Jacki, your idea sounds good to me. And despite what you may have heard, there is nothing wrong with prologues. Plenty of thrillers have them. I believe every one of Steven James's novels begins with a lengthy prologue, usually something that at first seems to have nothing to do with the main story, and whose meaning is revealed only later. Some agents may not like prologues, but some agents dislike sex scenes, some dislike profanity, some dislike graphic violence, etc. You can't worry about what every agent may or may not like. As far as readers skipping prologues, perhaps some do, but that's their problem. Some readers skip lengthy descriptions.

Make your prologue grab the reader's attention and hold it. That's the key.

--Warren
"Wagner's 'Das Rheingold'" (Oxford 1993). Winner of the Society for Music Theory's Wallace Berry Award, 1995.

"Elements of Sonata Theory" co-authored with James Hepokoski(Oxford 2006). Winner of the Society for Music Theory's Wallace Berry Award, 2008.

jackitaylor
Private First Class
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2017 9:24 am

Re: prologue

Postby jackitaylor » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:41 pm

Thanks for the thumbs up wdarcy! I might post the prologue, just to see if anybody thinks it grabs attention.

User avatar
wdarcy
Major
 
Posts: 1702
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:13 pm

Re: prologue

Postby wdarcy » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:44 pm

[quote="jackitaylor"]Thanks for the thumbs up wdarcy! I might post the prologue, just to see if anybody thinks it grabs attention.[/quote]


Yes, post it in the proper critique forum. And please call me Warren! :)

--Warren
"Wagner's 'Das Rheingold'" (Oxford 1993). Winner of the Society for Music Theory's Wallace Berry Award, 1995.

"Elements of Sonata Theory" co-authored with James Hepokoski(Oxford 2006). Winner of the Society for Music Theory's Wallace Berry Award, 2008.

jackitaylor
Private First Class
 
Posts: 123
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2017 9:24 am

Re: prologue

Postby jackitaylor » Sat Sep 02, 2017 6:19 am

Actually, this is something that wasn't the original plot or idea. This character was supposed to die near the end, like the other "bad guys" lol, but when i was working on his background and development, i discovered he was far more interesting than I thought, to where I wanted to be able to write about him more and know him better. strange, or perhaps not so strange.


Return to Writers' Block Party

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron