Marketing After you Self-Publish

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Starchaser3000
 
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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby Starchaser3000 » Tue Nov 20, 2012 6:43 pm

Linton Robinson wrote:One thing nice about the expanding international nature of the net (and being lucky enough to write in English) is that there are huge, growing markets for English books in India and China.


I have heard about this. So how can a self published author like me get their books into reading markets in Asia and Europe? Or at least what is the financial cost to do so?

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TerryRodgers
 
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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby TerryRodgers » Tue Nov 20, 2012 9:04 pm

Starchaser3000 wrote:
Linton Robinson wrote:One thing nice about the expanding international nature of the net (and being lucky enough to write in English) is that there are huge, growing markets for English books in India and China.


I have heard about this. So how can a self published author like me get their books into reading markets in Asia and Europe? Or at least what is the financial cost to do so?


I don't know if you have to do any additional marketing. If India and China can browse the Internet, they can find Amazon, Smashwords, etc.

Starchaser3000
 
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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby Starchaser3000 » Tue Nov 20, 2012 9:37 pm

I was thinking more in terms if I could submit a paperback to a book expo or a review company over there.

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Linton Robinson
 
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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby Linton Robinson » Sat Dec 08, 2012 12:09 pm

It's important to understand that you can't rely on people "browsing amazon" and running into your book.
It's not like a mall, where people walk by everything. Closer to the last act of "Raiders of the Arc".
People are not going to find your book. You have to grab their eyeballs and drag them to the buy button.

This is a hugely establshed fact of moving books, but one that it takes newbies awhile to pick up. You see spending a lot of time and money to get on every venue in the universe, and always seeking new "online bookstores", thinking that having a book on all these places helps it sell.
It doesn't.

You're better off having it in one place and directing your promotion and marketing towards populating that place with customers.

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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby jbcameron » Thu Feb 28, 2013 1:03 pm

After becoming disenchanted with publishers' need for an established fan-base for a book, before even considering it for publication, I finally bit the bullet and published the first book of my paranormal detective series *exclusively* on Amazon Kindle two weeks ago today. Up until yesterday, I was fully engaged in marketing it. My efforts have managed to catch two new readers along the way, so far. It probably doesn't sound like much for two weeks of hard work, but then I'm not really holding out hope of becoming a millionaire overnight from my "Kindle-only instant best-seller." Back in the 90's, I enjoyed limited success with maintaining a constant reader base for my ongoing webcomic series. Visitors didn't flock there overnight, either. It took years of content updating and networking. In my experience, a successful marketing campaign requires constant nourishment, and often might not bear fruit for some time. My advice to anyone heading down this path is two-fold: (1) have patience, and (2) don't let the effort of marketing your existing work get in the way of writing something new. The most important thing you can provide is fresh content.

In http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2012/03/ ... e-authors/ (mentioned in this thread earlier), Joanna Penn states not to get bogged down with "shiny object syndrome" when it comes to jumping on the social networking bandwagon. That's good advice. It's easy to become so fixated on marketing that you lose sight of creating. However, the one point that I disagree with her recommendations is where she advises to spread out your involvement in the different forms of social media over a prolonged period. I'm going to offer you some different advice on the matter. Ready for it? Here it is:

Plan your marketing strategy ahead of time. Use your strengths to supplement your book release with value-added content. Then market the hell out of it!

This was a little something I learned back in my webcomic days. Why offer just a stale comic that changes every week, when you can add related features that keep bringing your visitors back daily? Prior to the publication of my book, I spent some quality time with Photoshop and a free interactive story tool called TWINE (http://www.gimcrackd.com/etc/src/). With a little effort, I developed an interactive preview of choice scenes from the opening chapters of my book, in the form of a text-based adventure. When it came time to publish and fire up the marketing machine, I devoted a week to the challenge - posting not only the book link, but artwork, the interactive preview link, and more. As the days went by, I added to the content, keeping Twitter and the Facebook content fresh, while advising online publishers of my short stories of the book's release, and directing their visitors to the new sites. As visitors trickled in, I teased them with updates to future content - a new book trailer, synopses of future book releases, Twitter retweets to short stories I published online, etc. I spent much of the following week putting together the trailer myself in Flash (which, in hindsight, I realized that I should have probably readied beforehand), and now have that published on Youtube, with updates feeding to an already established and growing collection of visitors. Free weekend downloads and eBlogging may be next on the agenda, but that's something for another day. Right now, I'm back into writing mode on my second book.

My point is: don't wait six months between the social networking sites. Establish your foothold on the internet and keep stoking the fires with new updates and content regularly. Get your name out there on forums, and avoid the urge to flood the internet with your book link. A link to a social media site is far less obtrusive than a direct link to Amazon, and earns you a better reputation in the long run.

If you build it, they will come... eventually. If you wait, expect to keep waiting forever.

JB.
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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby max2011 » Thu Feb 28, 2013 8:43 pm

That was great info. Thanks ;)

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wondo
 
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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby wondo » Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:19 pm

I dunno, I still think the key is to just keep experimenting with different genres. Just keep writing. It is a long term commitment that will yield fruit over time. Try both fiction and non fiction until you find out what people buy. I have been doing both and, like I said, just now starting to reach sales figures that make me smile a bit. I am starting to gather enough info as to what I should primarily write. Some of the stuff I like the least is actually what seems to sell. You never know. I really don't think you can just stick one or two books up there and be successful unless you are really lucky. I never had much in the way of luck so I don't trust to that. As I have said before, it is not a "get rich quick" kind of thing. It takes work, time and commitment. Just don't slack off the writing for promotion or other activities. Writing is what writers do. Write it, edit it and revise it, then stick it up there and move on to the next project. The readers will find it eventually. If you have a lot of material up there, then it all becomes gravy. There is evidence that publishers are trolling through self published material, so if you have stuff up there there is a chance that someone will see it and offer a publishing contract. In my case, I don't really care. I don't really care if I ever get published or not. I just love looking at my Smashwords and Amazon statements and seeing that people actually fork over money to buy what I write. To me that is enough.
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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby jbcameron » Sat Mar 02, 2013 8:18 am

I dunno, I still think the key is to just keep experimenting with different genres. Just keep writing. It is a long term commitment that will yield fruit over time.

I agree. There's no better way to ensure reader interest than by constantly adding to your portfolio. Experimenting with genres is a great way to not only hone your talents, but to discover your writing strengths. I dabbled in science fiction and fantasy briefly, before moving into horror. The effort led me to discover that my real writing passion lies more in a combination of suspense and action, with a true love for witty banter to lighten the more casual moments. It's interesting to me that the act of writing is as much a journey of self-discovery as it is of creation.

Unfortunately, marketing is a necessary evil when it comes to self-publishing. Scheduling time for both it and my writing is what helps me manage both. I've found that planning ahead and taking the time beforehand to set yourself up on the social networking sites that you want to use to market yourself also saves valuable time later.

I hear sometimes about writers making millions from their Amazon Kindle book sales. Some people survive getting struck by lightning too, so I guess anything's possible. If making a fortune is your only incentive for writing, I figure you're probably doing something wrong. My goal is to one day walk into a bookstore or library and see someone perusing one of my books. I can't think of a more awesome high than that. Barring some amazing fortune, that's not something that's apt to happen overnight. Until that happy day, all one can do is to keep writing, remain patient, and keep stoking the marketing flames a little bit at a time.

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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby patskywriter » Sun Jul 21, 2013 6:06 am

I don't know why I get the sense that writers are being defeatist when they say things like "marketing is a necessary evil" and "writing is what writers do, so just write [reworded]." I'm sure you're not meaning to sound this way, but it just sounds weird to me. Why bother with publishing if you're willing to settle for having no readers (or just a few readers)? I'm baffled.

Local (North Carolina Piedmont area) writers and publishers send me their books and I feature them, one by one, in my online community newspaper. I also invite them to be guests on my weekly radio program, and have been doing so for the past 11 years. I now have a weekly livestreaming Internet show where I interview writers (and others) from around the country (soon the world—a few future guests are in England and Brazil!). I started with local writers, and now that I'm on the Internet, I'm hearing from big-time publishing companies from across the USA. (Next week's Internet show will feature a former NBA star who has invented a medical/training device.)

The common denominator seems to be confidence, coupled with a desire to get out there, get known, and make some sales. I have mentioned this in other writing forums (not seeking writers but just adding to the conversation), and have noticed that not one writer has had the nerve or made an effort to contact me. And it's not that I'm such a big deal. From what I gather, many (most?) writers aren't even trying to get in touch with their own local media and lack real marketing skills. I dunno—I think you guys need to have a higher opinion of yourselves. Writing, completing, and publishing an entire book is a big, big deal, and for all the work you're doing, I don't get the sense that you're seeing that. Just my 2¢.
Currently working on my first nonfiction book, tentatively titled: "And Then We Saw an Eye: Caring for Someone with Alzheimer's at Home."

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Re: Marketing After you Self-Publish

Postby sherry_soule » Sat Aug 23, 2014 11:29 am

I would start contacting book bloggers and requesting a book review. If you’ve been in this industry for a while or you’ve just published your first book, I’m sure you’ve already realized by now that there is a ton of different ways to build a readership, obtain honest book reviews, and promote your novel. If you want to achieve success, one important factor is getting books reviews on sites like Amazon and Goodreads.

Here are a few more ideas that will help with your next book launch or starting today. ;)

One, word-of-mouth is the best. Even through the Internet.
Two, book reviews. Lots and lots of reviews on Amazon and Goodreads.
Three, promoting on your social media sites like Facebook and Twitter.
Four, connect with other authors and promote each other’s work.
Five, book bloggers should become your best friends.
Six, create and maintain a reader email contact list.

Best of luck!

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