Your Approach to Writing

Here's the place to share a writing or marketing tip you've used successfully and want to pass along.
sammy2
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Re: Your Approach to Writing

Postby sammy2 » Sat Oct 07, 2017 11:15 am

[quote="Harold Saxon"]I'm a pantser/organic writer.

That's the way I write. I'm new to it. At this point, I can't outline because I don't know what the ending is, how the story goes. The story occurs to me as I write, and I have learned that the characters do speak to you. I found it funny when I heard writers say that, but it's True! :) Several people who have read it, have told me that it looks like a deep outline. It probably is, but it's not written as an outline. Then it gets fattened up as the scenes build. I call it the concept, skeleton; where I add 'meat' to the bones.

It depends on the person. My draft ignores tenses and POVs.It's what naturally comes when writing. Usually in 3rd present with some mixed tenses and POV. The revision changes it to past.[/quote]


Almost sounds like the snowflake method.

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robjvargas
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Re: Your Approach to Writing

Postby robjvargas » Sat Oct 07, 2017 6:02 pm

[quote="sammy2"]
Almost sounds like the snowflake method.[/quote]
Perhaps. I think sometimes we forget that these "methods" originated from some less organized or "formal" beginnings. Someone recognized a formula that worked for them, gave it a name, and VIOLA! (sarcasm, and having fun with spelling). It can be tough, sometimes, to determine which is cart, and which is horse.
Slowly putting together a "replacement" forum at http://writerswriting.proboards.com.

It's still under construction, but come take a look.

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ostarella
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Re: Your Approach to Writing

Postby ostarella » Sat Oct 07, 2017 6:47 pm

[quote="robjvargas"]
Perhaps. I think sometimes we forget that these "methods" originated from some less organized or "formal" beginnings. Someone recognized a formula that worked for them, gave it a name, and VIOLA! (sarcasm, and having fun with spelling). It can be tough, sometimes, to determine which is cart, and which is horse.[/quote]

The problem with naming methods is that they become "formalized" - ie, people then think you need to follow the "rules" of that method. And then, of course, if a writer can't write following the "rules", despair reigns.

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