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Re: Hooks

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:04 pm
by rob-lost
==some people say in line others say on line
both mean waiting to be served like at a box office selling tickets ==

Not according to Merriam-Webster.

in-line:
having the parts or units arranged in a straight line; also : being so arranged
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/in-line

online:
connected to, served by, or available through a system and especially a computer or telecommunications system (such as the Internet)
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/online

There's the phrase "fall in line," but that's a bit different as well:
to start to do what one is told or required to do
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inline

So the words are not really related in usage.

Re: Hooks

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:34 pm
by mike m.
[quote="rob-lost"]==some people say in line others say on line
both mean waiting to be served like at a box office selling tickets ==

Not according to Merriam-Webster.

in-line:
having the parts or units arranged in a straight line; also : being so arranged
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/in-line

online:
connected to, served by, or available through a system and especially a computer or telecommunications system (such as the Internet)
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/online

There's the phrase "fall in line," but that's a bit different as well:
to start to do what one is told or required to do
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/inline

So the words are not really related in usage.[/quote]

====

as i noted
they were regional usages
no matter what webster says
UK english, American English, australian english, and international standard english are not identical
nor is webster the authority of dictating usage -- all they can do is report long after the fact

and usage changes over time

Re: Hooks

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:11 pm
by rob-lost
Sure, "mike." And we must listen to you over and above any posted references.

==UK english, American English, australian english, and international standard english are not identical ==
OK, let's go with that. What does each mean in the UK, Australia, and wherever "International Standard" applies?

Re: Hooks

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:18 pm
by mike m.
[quote="rob-lost"]Sure, "mike." And we must listen to you over and above any posted references.

==UK english, American English, australian english, and international standard english are not identical ==
OK, let's go with that. What does each mean in the UK, Australia, and wherever "International Standard" applies?[/quote]
=======

it depends whether you want to communicate or merely be pedantic

Re: Hooks

PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 1:39 pm
by rob-lost
@mike M:
==OK, let's go with that. What does each mean in the UK, Australia, and wherever "International Standard" applies?==