[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
Changing Your Childhood - 2/8 : Writing Prompts and Challenges • Writing Forum | WritersDigest.com

Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

The editors of Writer's Digest provide a weekly Writing Prompt to get your writing going.
Brian
Lieutenant
 
Posts: 927
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2005 5:07 am

Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby Brian » Tue Feb 08, 2011 3:20 am


Brian
Lieutenant
 
Posts: 927
Joined: Thu Sep 15, 2005 5:07 am

Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby Brian » Tue Feb 08, 2011 3:20 am

Pick an event from your childhood that you wish would have gone differently. Write it as though it had happened ideally.

You can post your response (750 words or fewer) here.

Depo
Private E-1
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:12 pm

RE: Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby Depo » Tue Feb 08, 2011 4:50 pm

I remember how excited I had been. My Daddy was coming home soon. I was four years old. Almost five. It had been nearly two years since I had seen him. I missed him so much. Sometimes I wondered if I would ever see him again.

All the grown-ups told me that he was doing important work and keeping the bad guy's away from America. See, my Dad was a U.S. Marine. The coolest thing in the world that you could be, in my young opinion. I wanted to be just like him. But, Grown-ups said lots of things that weren't true it seemed. Or made promises they couldn't keep. Even at this early age, I had learned to be weary of the things they said in regards to my father.

I heard them talking about him a lot the last couple of days, though. Some of it I understood, some of it I didn't, and some of it sat in the fuzzy, just out of reach place, in between comprehension and confusion.

I heard my Mommy say to Grandma that her and Daddy were going to get back together. That maybe we might move. I knew what that meant, and as I hid under the kitchen table, I held back tears of joy and fear, afraid because I didn't want to get my hopes up. I heard them say that he would be home in two days. I heard my Mommy say that after the close call, that her and Daddy had realized what was important in life and that they regretted splitting up in the first place. The “ Close Call”, had something to do with Daddy almost getting his “ Head Shot Off” out in the middle of the “ F***ing Desert.”

I got the jist of most of this conversation, but not all of it. All I knew for sure was that my Dad was probably, really coming home this time, that him and Mommy were probably, really going to get back together, that we might have to move, and that something really bad almost happened to Daddy. I knew it was bad because Mommy couldn't talk about it without crying and using bad words. I didn't care about anything but my Daddy coming home. The thought of that pushed everything else the Grown-ups were talking about out of my head. I silently climbed out from under the kitchen table where I was hiding, and slipped undetected into my bedroom, where I locked the door and pretended to play with my toys. What I actually did was cry silently with relief and some apprehension. “ Big Danny”, as everyone called my dad, was big. He was my hero. Both giant in physical stature and a juggernaut capable of anything in my mind and imagination. The thought that he could die or even get a minor scratch was unthinkable to me. My Daddy was invincible. But, all the talk of the Grown-ups, and the fear and worry I heard in my Mother and other families voices when they talked about the “ Close Call”, had rattled me. I knew my Daddy had a dangerous job, but the words, “ BULLET”, and “ BRAIN”, put together, scared the heck out of me. Nothing or no one could even come close to hurting my Daddy as far as I was concerned. I would not have it any other way.

Worn out from sneaking around and too much excitement, my head spinning with fantasy's of how it would be when Dad got home, I curled up on my bedroom floor, amongst my toys, and had an awful nightmare.

I dreamed that I was playing Dominoes with my Mother. She was drunk and looked sad. On the verge of tears. I couldn't contain my curiosity anymore and asked her, “ Mom, when is Daddy coming home?” She only stared at me a moment, then with the tears finally spilling over she said in a cold voice, “ You know he's dead don't you? Some bastard shot his f***ing head off out in the middle of the desert. It was an accident.” Faking brave, phony tough, I said, “ Yea. I figured he was. Mama, can I go to my room? I don't feel like playing anymore.”
“ Yes, you can. Leave me alone for awhile.”
“ OK.”

In the dream, I ran to my room, broke all my toys, and cried. I heard my uncle talking to me. I woke up.

GuaGuaGirl
Private E-1
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Dec 22, 2010 5:49 pm

Re: Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby GuaGuaGirl » Wed Feb 09, 2011 1:52 am

I looked up, my ten-year-old self wide-eyed. "Mr. Jacques?"

That face I knew so well from the back covers of my Redwall books was beaming down at me, wearing his hat like the one my grandfather used to wear, and that voice I'd heard on so many audiotapes spilled out of his mouth. "Hello, matey."

"I love your books!"

"Thank you so much."

"I want to be a writer, too, someday."

He winked at me. "I hope you do. Martin the Warrior hopes you do."

~

I wish that he had said that. I would have hugged him the way a little girl hugs Santa Claus, and I would have been so happy...

I missed that book signing, and I regretted it for the rest of my life.

Now I'm 17 years old, still a little teary because my favorite author had to die the day after my birthday...

R.I.P. Brian Jacques

loganatr
Private E-1
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Sun Jan 16, 2011 5:50 pm

RE: Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby loganatr » Wed Feb 09, 2011 3:59 am

After I asked her out and she said yes, I went home, ate well, and got some sleep. Hahaha, I heard about some loser who stayed up all night chain smoking cigarettes and wondering if some girl he liked was going to say yes or no because she was “thinking about it,” but my girl wasn't the type to try to keep someone on the hook, she was the best girl in the world!
The next morning, eager for another super-fun day of school, where the teachers liked me and weren't challenged by the fact that I'd passed my proficiency test the first time around, I woke up early, exercised, had a filling and nourishing breakfast, and drove to school, not having to wait for my sister, who my mother reasonably agreed was just going to have to be late if she wasn't ready to go by the time I usually left for school.
When I was there, I hung out by my locker like everybody else did, and when I saw her walk down the hall, the first thing that I noticed was that I could see her! The cloud of people around her had mysteriously vanished; I could talk to her in school without having to wade through what passed for the intellectual and creative interests in my class, mostly the one kid who still wore a WWJD necklace I'd given him in eighth grade; and a girl who'd just discovered the word “feminism” without any of the strictures that further exploration might have imposed.
“Man, you look hot today,” I said, effortlessly striking the right tone of casual interest that was so popular among the young ladies at my school, although she was definitely equal to occasional references to poetic, metaphysical, and theological works when she inspired me to more flighty considerations. Latent homosexuality has very little context in this story.
“Thanks,” she blushed, not sure if she liked what I was running up the flagpole. She hadn't had a guy who hadn't bathed in two or three days tell her that he masturbated to her that very morning, so her stomach was as not-queasy as mine was because she was happy; and I hadn't not slept and hadn't chain-smoked on my back porch nervously.
The rest of the week passed quickly, and when I took her out, it was that weekend and not a hilariously long time after the first blush of my interest, and things didn't feel awkward at all. She let me kiss her that night, and honestly, I felt feelings I'd never known of before, with her and not my buddy's ex-girlfriend two years later. I attacked her ferociously and eagerly as things started heating up, but she made a move I totally respected, in telling me that she'd had enough for one night, that things weren't going to go “that far.”
We dated for a while, which I know all about, but finally things did run their course. She and I were four hours away at school, so after a semester of trying the long-distance thing, we ended things amiably. Still, that year-plus, the summer before senior year and senior year itself, were wonderful, one of the great periods of my life. God, that was sooo great, I'm glad I know all about that kind of stuff!

Trissa
Private E-2
 
Posts: 68
Joined: Sun Dec 26, 2010 5:38 pm

Re: Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby Trissa » Wed Feb 09, 2011 6:34 am

The year I was 13 was a heady year. I was finally a teen-ager and looking forward to high school. It was Christmas break and the New Year was looming. I wanted to do something that equaled the future I saw dawning before me.

I raided my closet for things that would remind me of my childish days. A pair of jeans mom had repaired with Teddy bear-shaped patches, an old gym suit from the days I once dreamed of being an Olympic medalist. After these items were packed away for the attic, I headed to the garage. The first object that caught my eye was a round, silver object made of metal. It was dented from years of use. Looking to see if anyone was watching, I snatched it up and headed for the hill behind our house. Memories of winter thrills sledding down the slope flooded back. I had to see if I could capture that feeling one last time.

At 13 the hill didn't look as daunting as it had just a few short years ago. I plopped it on the powdery new snow that had fallen the night before. Kneeling in the snow, I took the handles and twisted the round "glider" into the snow a couple of times. An idea popped into my head and I ran into the house almost knocking my mother over in the kitchen.

I heard her yell, "Hey! Where are you going with my waxed paper?" as I bolted out the back.

I waxed the bottom of the "glider" until it glistened. I then plopped myself on the "glider". I barely had to push. It seemed like nano-seconds as I careened down what now seemed a steep decline. Funny how speed and an uncontrollable object change your perspective of things. Panic hit as I realized how fast I was headed toward an old evergreen. Grabbing the "glider" handles I pulled back and forth with all my might making the "glider" rotate wildly.

Everything slowed as it usually does when you see the accident coming. "Crunch!" As the "glider" continued to fly down the slope, I found myself tangled in tree limbs that smelled like Christmas morning. When the buzzing sounds in my ears finally stopped, I heard voices as family members pounded down the hill towards me.

"You could have broken something," was repeated over and over by my mom, dad, brother, an uncle, and my obnoxious cousin Bob.

I see myself rising from a pile of snow and broken branches and hobbling back to the house for a cup of hot chocolate and scoldings from my family.

(Instead, I'm sitting with eyes glazed as an ER tech arranges my broken wrist on an X-ray plate. "You're damn lucky it wasn't your skull," she says. "What a way to start the New Year.")

theSkilled
Private E-1
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2010 3:08 pm

RE: Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby theSkilled » Wed Feb 09, 2011 12:28 pm

It was Gary Coleman's car, that big, bright red sports car that made a vroom sound when you stepped on the gas peddle too hard. This was the summer that was supposed to change me, my transition from ninth to tenth grade. It was the year that I was to move from my Dad's house and into my Mother's, my Mother having a big city appartment instead of the cramped two-bedroom flat I had lived in at the time. Out in West Covewalk Grove, the quietist town to ever exist, I had never felt so alone.

Anyways, it was Gary Coleman's car. Gary was Nick's older brother, a college-flunkie with shaggy black facial hair and a southern accent that sounded as if he was holding a thousand marbles in his jaw. Nick Coleman was my best friend. We knew each other since we were both five, when I had first moved to West Covewalk Grove, the quietist down to ever exist. In that red sports car, driving down a dirt road in the middle of pastures and abandoned farms were Gary, Nick, Shelby, my half-sister and I. Shelby had strawberry-blond hair so thick you could stick your fingure in it and never pull it out. She was the pretty one, the popular one, but I never hated her. I never hated her until that summer, the summer when she'd have my Dad all to herself and I had never felt so alone.

The sun was just setting and the sky was splashed with orange, yellow and red. Gary was telling some sort of dirty story, I cannot remeber what it was about, but I remember Nick throwing his head back in that attractive way he always did, his shiny brown hair flapping in the intense wind as Gary once again pressed down on the gas peddle in that way that Shelby cringed by. She had a look of disgust on her face that seemed to say, How do you hang out with these nobodies? My face shot back with, Why do you care? I always put Shelby before me, she was just a month younger than me, and I was supposed to hate her for splitting my family up. I was supposed to hate my Dad for getting Shelby's mom pregnant right after he broke up with my Mother. But I didn't. I loved Shelby, even though she didn't get me. I was the bookworm, the loner, the one who sits by the window, the one who never talks and the one who no one knows. Never had I realized my status as far as popularity had gone, nor had I ever cared. Except on this evening. I had never felt so alone.

Gary Coleman suddenly stopped laughing as his car swirved uncontrolably. Everyone screamed. He got off the trail and slammed into an abandoned barn. His bright red sportscar flipped over and, since the hood was up, we all flew out. Everyone, that was, except Nick and I. We had all gone unconcious. When I awoke, the sky was black and a million twinkling stars hung above my head. My buckle must have broken and I was laying face-down in the dirt. When I rolled on to my back I saw Nick, his face white and he, too, was laying on the ground. Unlike how I had landed, he was laying on his back. He didn't move. I had never felt so alone.

Little did I know that Nick was still alive. He was in a deep traumatic-stage coma. I also didn't know that he was secretly gasping for breath. Instead of rushing to his side to preform CPR, I ran to go comfort my crying Shelby. I wish I could have saved Nick. I wish I could go back and hold him instead of my greedy half-sister. Maybe then I wouldn't have felt so alone.


Bellaisthename
Private E-1
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Mar 12, 2011 7:25 am

RE: Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby Bellaisthename » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:01 am

"You are such a smartass! I don't need your crap today!" my mom yelled as she slammed the TV remote on the floor in frustration.
I had to admit she was right, but I didn't see what I'd done to make her say that. All I'd ask was where Dad was. My 12 year old self was full of questions when Dad didn't come home after his doctor's appiontment.
"I wasn't being a smartass! I don't know what's wrong but I have the right to know! He's my Dad, you know!" I screamed, fighting back tears.
Was Dad dead? Did the test come back positive? I'd known more than they thought I knew. My brother told me everything they didn't tell me because I was too young. He was a wreck right now, watching my mom and I battle in front of him. If words could kill, she would be dead by now.
"Abby, look. Your father...has cancer. He's in the hospital right now." my mom said, suddenly calm.
Then she broke out into tears. My brother embraced her as she sobbed, but I was fuming in the corner. Why had she kept that a secret from me?!?! My dad was gonna die and she wasn't going to tell me?
"HOW LONG HAVE YOU KNOWN THIS?!!" I shouted.
My brother looked at me and shook his head no. I knew what he meant. Not right now. She feels pain, too. I nodded to show I understood and retreated to the solitude of my room. My mom, who usually yells at me for going into my room because I rarely leave it, remained silent as I locked the door and began to sob uncontrollably. I slid down the wall, hiding my face in my hands.
My cell phone started ringing. It was my best friend Lydia. I picked it up, then set it down again. I was in no state to talk. I pulled my knees up to my chest and huddled in the corner of my room. I sat there in silence, crying, when I reached for a coat. My hands found something sharp in the pocket and I took it out to examine it. Clear glass, a gift from a friend of mine. Still crying, I dragged the sharp part of the glass down my arms and legs, across my stomach and all over my hands. Bleeding, I threw the glass across the room where it hit the wall and shattered. I burried my face in my knees once more, overcome with loss.
That's what actually happened. I wish every day that I wouldn't have asked. That the test had come back negative. That the whole thing hadn't happened. That I hadn't picked up that piece of glass.
For anyone who is wondering, my dad didn't die. He is still with our family, he was saved by surgery and is back to living out life again, 2 years later. But I was still pretty shaken by the whole thing.

linda risk
Private E-1
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Mar 13, 2011 1:00 pm

RE: Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby linda risk » Sun Mar 13, 2011 1:38 pm

I wish when I was in Grade 8 I would have had the courage to approach my English teacher and seek their encouragement to pursue my dream to be a writer. Creative Writing was my passion. I could write a 12 page story just from my head. I believe that if I had been given moral support I would have pursued my dream job and I may have had a published book by the age of 14.

anyuta34i
Private E-1
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 5:04 pm

Re: Changing Your Childhood - 2/8

Postby anyuta34i » Mon Mar 14, 2011 5:13 pm

When the 3 morning arrived the Druids would give a piece of wood from their fires to each family,then they would take them home to start new cooking fires.These fires would keep the homes warm and free from evil

Next

Return to Writing Prompts and Challenges

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests