First Album 2/10-2/16

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dryersheet
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Re: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby dryersheet » Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:49 pm

I joined the game late - I think I was in 8th grade. I remember the first CD I owned because I remember having to admit to my drum teacher that I only owned one CD. She asked, "What kind of music do you listen to? You must own CDs." I corrected her, telling her that I owned a single CD. And that it was Metallica - Metallica, otherwise known as "The Black Album." It was an inauspicious beginning, given that Metallica wasn't, and still isn't, the brand of cool that any kid should seek to align himself with. Especially a darkish, nerdy kid who has trouble relating to the kinds of kids who make easy references to reality shows on MTV and wear T-shirts with logos on them and such. For me, it was the beginning of an even darker and nerdier chapter. Because I only expanded my collection by about one CD a year, my listening was almost perversely obsessive. Ask me to recite any lyric from any song from Metallica - Metallica today, nearly twenty years after the album's release, and I will do so with sad, pathetic accuracy. I would wander down the halls chanting the lyrics to myself, scrawling them in the margins of spelling tests. And for some reason, I was confused when my bevy of sympathizers did not grow. All in all, my decade long affair with Metallica (that Napster business really took the magic out of the relationship) served one standout purpose (aside from indelibly sullying my musical tastes): it helped me grow accustomed to being an outsider. Don't get me wrong, I was dorky enough to be an outsider without the metal, but because I had something to uphold, something that was grating and repulsive to others but beautiful and personal to me, I somehow felt as if my solitude had meaning. It made me feel as if they were the outsiders, and I was the sole insider, the only kid in a tiny town of 6,000 who appreciated incessant palm muting and double bass and terrible, terrible lyrics about turning into a werewolf. It was like a religion to me.

On another note: Hi! I just found this site when Googling. And I think I'll hang out for a spell.

wouldbewordsmith
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Re: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby wouldbewordsmith » Mon Feb 23, 2009 5:30 am

I bought my first album in the late 1960s with my babysitting money - an LP of Wagner overtures with the NBC Symphony Overture conducted by Toscanini. I listened to that record over and over and over as it had several of my favorites on it - particularly the Die Meistersinger overture. Said overture remains a favorite to this very day and in fact I still own the record though I've not played it in years.

wouldbewordsmith
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Re: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby wouldbewordsmith » Mon Feb 23, 2009 5:30 am

I bought my first album in the late 1960s with my babysitting money - an LP of Wagner overtures with the NBC Symphony Overture conducted by Toscanini. I listened to that record over and over and over as it had several of my favorites on it - particularly the Die Meistersinger overture. Said overture remains a favorite to this very day and in fact I still own the record though I've not played it in years.

warhoop63
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RE: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby warhoop63 » Mon Feb 23, 2009 8:57 am

The year was 1977, and 7th grade was introducing me to all kinds of new experiences. One experience was the discovry of modern rock and roll music. Before I had been catching up via my uncle's collection of 60's and early 70's rock. One day as I was walking down the hall in school, involved in another new discovery, looking at girls. I saw a t-shirt that would change my life. Tammy had on one of those new poop unicorns and rainbows with the iron on decals. The decal was the faces of Kiss. I asked her who they were, she told me the next day she brought her 8 track player to school and let me hear them. That day I went to Blevin's Drug Store and found a copy of Kiss Destroyer in the 8-track case. For over a week I would go by there reach my hand through the hole in the plexiglass door and read the song list, look at the cover art. Finally the day came when enough allowance had been saved to buy the sought after grail. My mind, and my interests in music changed litterly within minutes. It was new, different, exciting. The sound of the drums amazed me, and led me on a path to become a drummer myself. I found power, and courage in the haunting guitars of the song Detroit Rock City, and emotion and pain in the strains of the ballad Beth. That one purchase chaned my entire focus and outlook on music. To this day I still go back to that album, and it still invigorates my emotions. Pehaps being in my formitive years something about the music cemented in my being, maybe it was my fist steps of dicoviering my world for my self that did it. Whatever it was it left its traces on my personality that last 30+ years later.

warhoop63
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RE: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby warhoop63 » Mon Feb 23, 2009 8:57 am

The year was 1977, and 7th grade was introducing me to all kinds of new experiences. One experience was the discovry of modern rock and roll music. Before I had been catching up via my uncle's collection of 60's and early 70's rock. One day as I was walking down the hall in school, involved in another new discovery, looking at girls. I saw a t-shirt that would change my life. Tammy had on one of those new poop unicorns and rainbows with the iron on decals. The decal was the faces of Kiss. I asked her who they were, she told me the next day she brought her 8 track player to school and let me hear them. That day I went to Blevin's Drug Store and found a copy of Kiss Destroyer in the 8-track case. For over a week I would go by there reach my hand through the hole in the plexiglass door and read the song list, look at the cover art. Finally the day came when enough allowance had been saved to buy the sought after grail. My mind, and my interests in music changed litterly within minutes. It was new, different, exciting. The sound of the drums amazed me, and led me on a path to become a drummer myself. I found power, and courage in the haunting guitars of the song Detroit Rock City, and emotion and pain in the strains of the ballad Beth. That one purchase chaned my entire focus and outlook on music. To this day I still go back to that album, and it still invigorates my emotions. Pehaps being in my formitive years something about the music cemented in my being, maybe it was my fist steps of dicoviering my world for my self that did it. Whatever it was it left its traces on my personality that last 30+ years later.

San
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RE: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby San » Tue Feb 24, 2009 4:31 am

I saw the ad on television many times. “Order now for just $9.99!” it shouted over the music playing in the background as the list of musical credits rolled up the screen. Oh how I wanted that album! I pleaded with my mother to buy it for me, but she wouldn’t. She kept telling me to save my allowance money.

“How am I ever going to save ten dollars with a dollar a week allowance?! That will take forever!” I would answer, but she would not give in.

Finally, the day arrived – I had ten dollars. My excitement overflowed as I rushed into the kitchen, money in hand, to ask my mother to order the record for me. “You need two more dollars for shipping and handling,” she told me deflating my ego as rapidly as a punctured balloon.

Two weeks later I approached her again, this time not allowing myself the thrill of excitement. “Can we order my record now?” I asked holding out my money.

“Yes.”

I handed her my money and practically pushed her to the telephone to call K-tel. Impatiently I circled her, listening to every little detail, as she made the call. Soon it would be mine! Before the telephone receiver was back in the cradle I began, “When will it get here? How long will it take?”

“Six to eight weeks.”

I was going to be the coolest kid in school with my new disco record. The next six weeks were long ones. I could frequently be found turning up the radio and dancing around with fingers pointing toward the ceiling when Saturday Night Fever aired.

Then, one day, a package in brown paper was waiting on the end of my bed when I got home from school. I ran to the bed, ripped off the paper and stared in awe at John Travolta on the cover in the dance pose of the time. An eternity passed. My mother found me sitting there staring at it and asked, “Aren’t you going to play it?” It was as though the thought had not occurred to me as I slowly stood, not taking my eyes off of the cover, to place my treasure on the record player.

The quiet hiss of the needle landing on the record sent a quiver of excitement down my spine. When the music started I exploded in laughter, unable to believe that I actually possessed the coolest record of anyone in third grade.

I cherished this record long past the time when disco was no longer the rage. Occasionally I would pull it out and stare at John Travolta on the cover with that same fascination I had as a child. But then my record player stopped working and cassettes and CDs were the new technology. I had no more use for the thing I had waited so long to get so I traded it to a used record store for a CD by The Damned.

lilia
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RE: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby lilia » Sat Feb 28, 2009 11:17 pm

Frank Sinatra, whose voice rang with heart when I was a 15-year old in my country in the Far East, has been the inspiration that guided my life, even in the midst of war and conflict that devastated my own country. I was young then, and my life and that of my family’s had been shattered with World War II. The cruelty that invaded my country was savage and destroyed not only the land but also the life, thinking, and ambitions of my people. But Frank Sinatra was alive over the radio, a smooth voice that told me there was sunshine behind the clouds of war, and a dawn of tomorrow was about to break.

The very first time I heard Frank Sinatra over the radio, my heart melted with songs that wiped the tears off my eyes and inspired me to take up writing when I entered the university. His many songs in different albums were music that flowed through me as I struggled to come out of my injuries. His voice rang with creative stimulus that helped me face the devastation of the loss of my home, the death of my family, and the aloneness that came with the end of the war.

Frank Sinatra sang to me - only me - and lifted the daily burdens of resuming my life, sans the destructive force of war and enmity. When I thought of giving it all up, there was Frank’s voice, coming out of the clouds and inspiring me to stand firm and be strong. When my spirits shattered into thoughts of anger - and rage - all I needed to do was turn on the radio and listen to Frank’s words through his songs, and I was at peace. My record player was my constant ally in the nights when I found no sleep nor rest because Frank’s records were there to allay my fears. Even my days were at times a hardship to bear but Frank’s songs were always within earshot.

I was undeniably the most fortunate of all people. Upon my arrival in California in the 70s, the best luck of my life came as I sat in a concert hall and watched Frank Sinatra go through all the songs that I have loved through the years. My tears flowed with his music and my heart sang and smiled as he emoted in front of a packed audience with, My Way. It was all I could do without breaking into a song with Frank!

But life is as cruel as a war that destroys peoples and lands. Frank Sinatra’s voice was all around me, every where in the streets, echoing in the mountains, and ringing in concert halls. His movies made every hurt turn to healing. His image became my constant companion through his recordings and albums. Because saying goodbye to Frank Sinatra when he passed away was NOT MY WAY.

(C)lilia2009

lilia
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RE: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby lilia » Sat Feb 28, 2009 11:17 pm

Frank Sinatra, whose voice rang with heart when I was a 15-year old in my country in the Far East, has been the inspiration that guided my life, even in the midst of war and conflict that devastated my own country. I was young then, and my life and that of my family’s had been shattered with World War II. The cruelty that invaded my country was savage and destroyed not only the land but also the life, thinking, and ambitions of my people. But Frank Sinatra was alive over the radio, a smooth voice that told me there was sunshine behind the clouds of war, and a dawn of tomorrow was about to break.

The very first time I heard Frank Sinatra over the radio, my heart melted with songs that wiped the tears off my eyes and inspired me to take up writing when I entered the university. His many songs in different albums were music that flowed through me as I struggled to come out of my injuries. His voice rang with creative stimulus that helped me face the devastation of the loss of my home, the death of my family, and the aloneness that came with the end of the war.

Frank Sinatra sang to me - only me - and lifted the daily burdens of resuming my life, sans the destructive force of war and enmity. When I thought of giving it all up, there was Frank’s voice, coming out of the clouds and inspiring me to stand firm and be strong. When my spirits shattered into thoughts of anger - and rage - all I needed to do was turn on the radio and listen to Frank’s words through his songs, and I was at peace. My record player was my constant ally in the nights when I found no sleep nor rest because Frank’s records were there to allay my fears. Even my days were at times a hardship to bear but Frank’s songs were always within earshot.

I was undeniably the most fortunate of all people. Upon my arrival in California in the 70s, the best luck of my life came as I sat in a concert hall and watched Frank Sinatra go through all the songs that I have loved through the years. My tears flowed with his music and my heart sang and smiled as he emoted in front of a packed audience with, My Way. It was all I could do without breaking into a song with Frank!

But life is as cruel as a war that destroys peoples and lands. Frank Sinatra’s voice was all around me, every where in the streets, echoing in the mountains, and ringing in concert halls. His movies made every hurt turn to healing. His image became my constant companion through his recordings and albums. Because saying goodbye to Frank Sinatra when he passed away was NOT MY WAY.

(C)lilia2009

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awhatevergirl
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RE: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby awhatevergirl » Tue Mar 03, 2009 1:17 am

I was 18. It was 1994. I have no idea how I got from Howell, NJ to Old Bridge, but there I was, standing on the pavement in the strip mall in front of the Old Country Buffet. In my hand was my first casette that really meant anything to me which I had bought from The Wiz in the same mall, Hole's Live Through This. I had heard it was really gaining ground in the music charts, outselling Nirvana, and starting a band of my own was something I had fantasized about a lot.

I don't know, but I can really identify with the screams that come across a female's lead. It's gut wrenching, it wreaks havoc, it can get out your agrrrrrression. I just saw Courtney Love as the woman I wanted to be, punky with barettes in her bleached blonde hair, porcelain skin and a booming voice. I wanted to be her. I looked up to her.

Guess what! It's 2009, and my copy of Live Through This has gone from casette, to CD to now on my iPod! I downloaded the Hole album and listen to it quite frequently, among many other songs. I really can't believe this album is 15 years old. It feels like it came out yesterday. The vocals sound strong and new and rich and overflowing with emotion.

I can really appreciate the other bands that came out in the '90's, but Hole's Live Through This is above and beyond, bar none. Thank you, Courtney Love. You are, America's Sweetheart.

"A whatever girl, entangled in the weeds that make up her life."
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josmel117
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RE: First Album 2/10-2/16

Postby josmel117 » Wed Mar 04, 2009 2:57 am

Wow ... now you’re going to know just how old I really am! My first album was a 45. It was “Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head” by B.J. Thomas. I was probably about 10 years old. In case you’re too young to remember ... a 45 is a smaller version of a record album. It consists of only two songs - one on each side. I believe that the flip side was another one of B.J. Thomas’ songs, “The More I See You, The More I Want You.” What can I tell you? I was 10 going on 40! Maybe that’s why I still act like a kid, because I was an adult when I was a kid. I’ll never forget how proud I was when I went to the store with my Dad and he let me pick out the album of my choice. I must have played those songs about 50 times a day. I had my record player on so many times, that we always had to replace the needle. I remember one day the needle being so worn that it scratched the record and ruined it. Of course, I cried my eyes out, but I knew that everyone in my family was cheering because they didn’t have to listen to B.J. Thomas anymore! To this day, whenever I hear those songs on the radio – which is either in an elevator, dentist’s office, or on an “oldies” station via Satellite radio, I can’t help but have the biggest smile on my face.

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