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Washington

PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:20 am
by Brian

Washington

PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:20 am
by Brian
List your Literary Hot Spots in Washington:

Name of City/Town:
Name of Hot Spot:
What makes this spot so great for writers?

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Re: Washington

PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2008 11:33 am
by skitty14
Seattle

Pike's Place Market, either outside watching the Sound when it's not raining, or inside on the first level near the Pike's Place Brewery.

When I lived in Seattle for a couple of years I wrote tons and tons of poetry in this market. I worked at DeLaurenti's Italian Market, which was actually in the building, and I would sneek away during lunch and write pages upon pages. I think it was something to do with the climate, the incessant soul-soaking rain, and my own sense of sadness that combined to make this a very productive experience for me. If I were to go back there right now, I would take up my pen, sit at my bench, and quietly slip off into poetic solitude. Alas, that was another time...

Re: Washington

PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 12:54 pm
by roxanneskelly
The counter to the Weekly is the alternative Stranger, with far more interesting writers IMHO.
Plenty of independent coffee shops providing nice writing atmosphere and caffein to give you a bit more stamina. Bauhaus, Victrola, Cherry Street, Diva, Ladro. Lots of real neighborhoods, each with it's own flavor. Capital Hill, with it's LGBT culture and excellent clubs. Belltown, a beehive of condos for hipster writing webpages or working for the software empires. Pioneer Square, the oldest part of town, with it's old brick buildings, software startups, and bars fully of yuppies or drunken ex-frat boys looking for fights, as well as Elliott bay books. The U-District, with students, homeless kids, and ex-hippies.
And there are independent theaters and small bookstores everywhere.

Don't go to the east side of lake washington. Endless tracts of McMansions, upscale shopping malls, and behemoth software companies.

RE: Washington

PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2009 4:21 pm
by ironvic
Bellingham, Washington.

Just south of the border sandwiched between Seattle and Vancouver, Bellingham is a writer's town. We have local papers, very politically oriented but with a far left slant, not much diversity of opinion, and that gets boring and predictable either way. I mean, how many ways can you write that George Bush is evil and Barack Obama is a saint? That Democrats are wonderful and Republicans are scum? Maybe it's because Western Washington University is located in town and college kids tend to think with the "left" side of their brains.

Politics aside, I still read the locals, good writing here. We also get The Stranger out of Seattle. Great little paper, same political slant as the locals but the writing is excellent, but you have to like F-bombs regularly falling off the pages. We have a large chain bookstore and the usual mall bookshops, but Bellingham really shines in the used book arena. By far, the best is Henderson Books located on Grand Avenue.

For inspiration, just have a seat at any of the local cafes and coffee houses. Downtown is loaded with bums, office girls and college students. It seems like every car has kayaks up on the roof. A good mix of personalities makes this a vibrant small town with more parks per square foot than any other place I've seen. Like salt water? The bay is beautiful and the view from the kayak cockpit is breathtaking.

RE: Washington

PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2009 4:21 pm
by ironvic
Bellingham, Washington.

Just south of the border sandwiched between Seattle and Vancouver, Bellingham is a writer's town. We have local papers, very politically oriented but with a far left slant, not much diversity of opinion, and that gets boring and predictable either way. I mean, how many ways can you write that George Bush is evil and Barack Obama is a saint? That Democrats are wonderful and Republicans are scum? Maybe it's because Western Washington University is located in town and college kids tend to think with the "left" side of their brains.

Politics aside, I still read the locals, good writing here. We also get The Stranger out of Seattle. Great little paper, same political slant as the locals but the writing is excellent, but you have to like F-bombs regularly falling off the pages. We have a large chain bookstore and the usual mall bookshops, but Bellingham really shines in the used book arena. By far, the best is Henderson Books located on Grand Avenue.

For inspiration, just have a seat at any of the local cafes and coffee houses. Downtown is loaded with bums, office girls and college students. It seems like every car has kayaks up on the roof. A good mix of personalities makes this a vibrant small town with more parks per square foot than any other place I've seen. Like salt water? The bay is beautiful and the view from the kayak cockpit is breathtaking.

Re: Washington

PostPosted: Fri Jun 25, 2010 8:30 pm
by angeleyes
Tacoma, WA
Anywhere along the waterfront. It's so nice there. Or Point Defiance Park. A lot of history in this area. Awesome views as well. On a good day you can see both the Cascade Moutains and the Olympics if you stand in just the right spot. Breathtaking.

Puyallup, WA

I love the back room of the Starbuck's on Meridian by "the old Safeway" You can reserve it and write with friends.

Re: Washington

PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2011 5:43 pm
by Bridget O' Brady
I'm not going to list a specific city but instead explain why Washington is a great place to write. Washington is very diverse, we have the rain forest, the coast, the desert, coniferous forests, regular forests, and the mountains all rolled into one. Of course that also creates our very diverse weather, but as anyone in Washington will tell you that is another story. One of my favorite places is Crescent Lake on the Olympic Peninsula it is beautiful and unique. Another thing that makes Washington a great place for writers is that the bigger cities are all to the north and a lot of smaller cities and small towns like mine are less that twenty miles from a big city. I believe Washington also has its own culture through our history and how we try to preserve it. Long Beach near Oregon is beautiful and a lot of the history is still in tact. If you are more of a deserty person than Eastern Washington is for you. They do get snow but it is much warmer there and is beautiful in its own way. Washington is very unique and a great place to write.