Good Education

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iceb
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Good Education

Postby iceb » Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:06 am

Every parent wants to boast that his or her child is “a straight A student,” “at the top of her class,” or “on the honor roll.” What generally determines this prized status? Grades. Most often, report cards are the primary means of measuring a child’s progress through school. Doing “well” in school is measured by a series of letters on a piece of paper: A is great; B is ok; C, not so great; and D or F? You’re grounded! Some parents reward children for good grades, ascribing a monetary value to each good letter, or taking away privileges for each bad one. For many families, the grade is the goal.

But what do those letters really mean? And do they really do any good?
(spam link removed -pls.

Many researchers, educators and parents are now questioning the purpose and effectiveness of grades. Certainly parents deserve to know how their children are doing in school, and students benefit from understanding how they are performing; but how that progress is communicated can have a great impact on how a child learns.
The research suggests three consistent effects of giving students grades – or leading them to focus on what grade they’ll get. First, their interest in the learning itself is diminished. Second, they come to prefer easier tasks – not because they’re lazy, but because they’re rational. After all, if the point is to get an A, your odds are better if you avoid taking intellectual risks. Third, students tend to think in a more superficial fashion – and to forget what they learned more quickly – when grades are involved.

To put it positively, students who are lucky enough to be in good colleges (or classrooms) where they don’t get letter or number grades are more likely to want to continue exploring whatever they’re learning, more likely to want to challenge themselves, and more likely to think deeply. The evidence on all of these effects is very clear, and it seems to apply to students of all ages.

As far as I can tell, there are absolutely no benefits of giving grades to balance against these three powerful negative consequences – except that doing so is familiar to us and doesn’t take much effort.

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pls
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Re: Good Education

Postby pls » Wed Feb 06, 2013 9:38 am

Kindly explain what your post has to do with writing. The link led to a sample chemistry test, which clearly is unrelated to anything forum users here would be interested in to improve their writing.

Speaking as a secondary language arts teacher for over 34 years, I find your reasons for not giving grades rather specious and shallow, btw.
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mammamaia
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Re: Good Education

Postby mammamaia » Wed Feb 06, 2013 1:14 pm

deleted dupe
Last edited by mammamaia on Wed Feb 06, 2013 1:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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mammamaia
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Re: Good Education

Postby mammamaia » Wed Feb 06, 2013 1:15 pm

ditto the question about why this is here?... this poster is a first-timer, so i can't help being suspicious about his/her motive...
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