Writing space isn't space writing.

Here you can post a picture of you in your writing space.
Buttered_Toast
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Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Buttered_Toast » Wed Sep 15, 2010 5:05 am


Buttered_Toast
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Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Buttered_Toast » Wed Sep 15, 2010 5:05 am

While having two very active children running around the home makes it hard to find sanctuary or solace within the midst of undulating chaos, I've learned to maximize this time by keeping most of my writing contained within my head. Leaving random notepads and writing utensils and other implements strewn about the house, in order to keep memory-saving devices near at hand. However, the drawback is trying to retrace the steps I took and put them into order, like an idea trail. Sometimes I'll put the same idea in several locations, just ensure redundancy, in case of losing some notes. It also indicates that I enjoy murdering trees in order to work on my craft. I know I should use electronic devices, in order to increase my carbon offset quotient. It's hard lugging around my laptop, though. Sometimes I won't make it back in time to retain my idea. It would also get expensive to keep laptops in every room of the house connected by a local wi-fi network.

Anyway, so my writing space typically finds its home within my own mind. I utilize my entire surroundings in order to achieve my writing. The biggest problem in such a diffuse approach is probably from how long it takes to consolidate all that information into a singular point. Kinda like exerting a gravitational pull to bring together all this space dust in order to create a new planet. Imagine the patience God would have, if he used a similar approach to the entire universe.

Perhaps this whole convoluted exposition would indicate the nature and description of my writing space. However, I am not sure thought actually occupies a space, so I guess it's more of a "virtual" writing space, without dimension or mass.

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Re: Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Buttered_Toast » Wed Sep 15, 2010 5:22 am

...Completely off-topic comment, sort of. I wonder how much we'd be able to change as a person, if we had a lifespan made up of billions of years. So, perhaps, there should be adequate time to actually finish a project.

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Re: Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby allz28 » Wed Sep 15, 2010 6:04 am

There are so many things I would like to do with life, that having billions of years sounds great. Well, maybe not "billions" but more time would be nice. Do you remember when you were a child and an hour felt like an eternity. Like if your parents said, "bed time in an hour," you thought, "YES, I have all the time in the world." I wish time had the same slow pace as we get older that it had when we were children.

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Re: Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Buttered_Toast » Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:43 pm

Time and age seem to have the same relationship as the different windows of different transports. The scenery changes as we move along, so does the view we are able to obtain depending on the windows we have available. There seems to be various waves and tides in this perception of time and its passage. When young, I would have never been able to look down the corridors toward the future; it was just too far away to relate to my experience as a child. Getting older, as we turn our gaze across the horizon of time, we are better able to see the approach of the next destination farther and farther down the road. The road we traveled up to this point seems to variably appear long behind or not that far back, but its length and distance is only increasing, and that awareness only grows. Different points along the journey have honestly made me reflect upon the past as a whole other lifetime. Like it was from some other person. How could that ever be me now? Knowing how it feels to be alive this long and extending that feeling further into the possible future, twice or three times as long, already makes my inner self feel tired. It seems far, but I've been going along this long already, what's a little further going to do? Then, extending this perception beyond the veil of this earthly life, imagining a possible existence out among the cosmos and the stars and maybe even other realms... It seems entirely and totally impossible to comprehend. Yet, the knowledge lingers that, if all things go well, I will eventually, and without question, know what that will be like and how it will feel. A mixture of excitement, impatience, and a sprinkle of apprehension.

I wonder if 33 is too young of an age to approach some sort of mid-life over-contemplation of mortality and time's progression. I don't know if it's ever too soon to consider it. I think everyone does, eventually. In the end, well, time seems entirely ridiculous. The role of faith here is to give us confidence that time will always operate according to its precise measure and give us the insight we require at every moment we occupy along its path.

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Re: Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Jamesaritchie » Fri Sep 17, 2010 2:47 am

My guess is that if we had billions of years we'd all become the worst procrastinators possible. "Eh, I'm going to live for billions of years. I'll do that later."

I suspect the awareness of imminent death gets much more done that the certainty of an immensely long life. Life is short. If you want to accomplish anything worthwhile, you need to find a way to get it done TODAY.

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Re: Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Buttered_Toast » Fri Sep 17, 2010 5:20 am

Hehe; I suppose the only lingering seed of apprehension in becoming gung-ho is the festering suspicion that, once we're dead and the grandeur of a life beyond the flesh reveals itself to us, someone there is like, "Surprise! We tricked you into performing your agenda, even though you REALLY had so much time left to do things in. We just love giving you false deadlines and a time limit. It's some spiritual sleight of hand. We hope you enjoyed the magic show! (Sucka!)"

However, one thing seems to survive the test of time, and that's each and every moment we occupy is NOW. The past has left us and the future isn't here yet. That makes every moment infinitely valuable, because it will never happen again. Maybe similar but not the same, ever. Time is an illusion. The present is always just the changed state of some latter moment. The moment isn't really gone, it's just a different one. Sameness in their differences. ...Reading Chris Langan's CTMU theory is very intriguing.

I guess, really, it just feels so incomprehensible that I exist at all. No knowledge of a pre-existence and little evidence to a post-existence here. Did I have anything to do with it? ...Perhaps this should wind up into the philosophy or spiritual section.

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Re: Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Buttered_Toast » Fri Sep 17, 2010 5:20 am

Hehe; I suppose the only lingering seed of apprehension in becoming gung-ho is the festering suspicion that, once we're dead and the grandeur of a life beyond the flesh reveals itself to us, someone there is like, "Surprise! We tricked you into performing your agenda, even though you REALLY had so much time left to do things in. We just love giving you false deadlines and a time limit. It's some spiritual sleight of hand. We hope you enjoyed the magic show! (Sucka!)"

However, one thing seems to survive the test of time, and that's each and every moment we occupy is NOW. The past has left us and the future isn't here yet. That makes every moment infinitely valuable, because it will never happen again. Maybe similar but not the same, ever. Time is an illusion. The present is always just the changed state of some latter moment. The moment isn't really gone, it's just a different one. Sameness in their differences. ...Reading Chris Langan's CTMU theory is very intriguing.

I guess, really, it just feels so incomprehensible that I exist at all. No knowledge of a pre-existence and little evidence to a post-existence here. Did I have anything to do with it? ...Perhaps this should wind up into the philosophy or spiritual section.

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Re: Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Mat_S » Sat Sep 18, 2010 10:25 am

"... the thing about time is that time isn't really real." -- James Taylor

Wow. Listening to you think is kind of like being inside my own head. Spooky. I've come up with an interesting way to explain the difference in time perception from childhood to adulthood. Everyone knows that time passes way differently when you're a kid. A year is an almost incomprehensible amount of time. I remember my parents would say something about doing something next year and I would think "how can they think that far ahead?". And, of course, as we get older, time just seems to fly by. There's never enough time in the day to get the things done that you want to get done, and tasks easily get put off days, weeks, even all the way to next year (ok, maybe that's just me).

Well, think of it this way: As a child of five years, a year's worth of experience would be 1/5 of your total sum experience. That's huge. That's too much for a child to comprehend in one gulp. That needs to be broken down and digested in smaller clumps. Therefore a month, a week, a day has that much more meaning for a child. That chunk of time is a much larger experience, relatively speaking, for a child as compared to an adult. Extrapolating the math down through the years to a child of ten, one year is 1/10 of his total experience (half as much, relatively, as to the five year old). And you, at 33, are experiencing a year as 1/33 of your total experience. Old hat to you. Been there, done that. You have already experienced so much time that, dare I say it, wisdom is creeping in.

So, the way we experience time is subjective, and we relate it to our stored knowledge of the passing of time. Imagine if you can truly achieve, as Taoists say, a state of mind where you experience the world "as a newborn babe". Imagine if every hour, every day, seemed like a limitless expanse of time. For there is only ever "now", as you point out. Past and future exist only in our minds.

Thanks for the mention on Chris Langan, by the way. I'd never heard of him before. I'll be looking into his CTMU theory... as time permits.

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Re: Writing space isn't space writing.

Postby Mat_S » Sat Sep 18, 2010 10:25 am

"... the thing about time is that time isn't really real." -- James Taylor

Wow. Listening to you think is kind of like being inside my own head. Spooky. I've come up with an interesting way to explain the difference in time perception from childhood to adulthood. Everyone knows that time passes way differently when you're a kid. A year is an almost incomprehensible amount of time. I remember my parents would say something about doing something next year and I would think "how can they think that far ahead?". And, of course, as we get older, time just seems to fly by. There's never enough time in the day to get the things done that you want to get done, and tasks easily get put off days, weeks, even all the way to next year (ok, maybe that's just me).

Well, think of it this way: As a child of five years, a year's worth of experience would be 1/5 of your total sum experience. That's huge. That's too much for a child to comprehend in one gulp. That needs to be broken down and digested in smaller clumps. Therefore a month, a week, a day has that much more meaning for a child. That chunk of time is a much larger experience, relatively speaking, for a child as compared to an adult. Extrapolating the math down through the years to a child of ten, one year is 1/10 of his total experience (half as much, relatively, as to the five year old). And you, at 33, are experiencing a year as 1/33 of your total experience. Old hat to you. Been there, done that. You have already experienced so much time that, dare I say it, wisdom is creeping in.

So, the way we experience time is subjective, and we relate it to our stored knowledge of the passing of time. Imagine if you can truly achieve, as Taoists say, a state of mind where you experience the world "as a newborn babe". Imagine if every hour, every day, seemed like a limitless expanse of time. For there is only ever "now", as you point out. Past and future exist only in our minds.

Thanks for the mention on Chris Langan, by the way. I'd never heard of him before. I'll be looking into his CTMU theory... as time permits.

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