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WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:35 pm
by sammy2
WD just sent some enticing offers. Has anyone used either of these?
I am not sure I can accept the 12 steps in the second one as being necessary AND sufficient.


For nano - write your novel in a month.

https://www.writersdigestshop.com/30-days-to-a-finished-novel-kit?utm_source=emedia_blast&utm_campaign=wds-cga-hs-171009&utm_content=974077_SHP_WD171009-+KOTM-+30+Days+to+Your+Novel&utm_medium=email

The link has a special on 9 resources to help you write your novel in a month. Great sale price $69 now.

Two of the resources blurbs:

How to Pre-Plot & Complete a Novel or Memoir in a Month
ONDEMAND WEBINAR

Pre-plotting is one of the most important steps to writing a book and avoiding numerous rewrites of your story! In this OnDemand webinar, Martha Alderson will share a practical technique to help you pre-plot visually (and quickly!) to help you write a novel quicker. After learning this technique, you'll have a strong grasp on your plot and be ready to complete your first draft in just one month. You'll be able to use your time most efficiently to write a best-selling plot in 30 days.

First Draft Outline
TUTORIAL

Say goodbye to writing and rewriting endlessly with no results. By starting your work with an outline, you know where to start digging, whether there truly is a story down there, and you know exactly which direction to go with it. Everything you plot from start to finish is good and worthwhile. First Draft in 30 Days author Karen S. Wiesner is your host for this tutorial.

The alternative is 12 weeks to the first draft seminar for $629:
https://www.writersonlineworkshops.com/courses/12-weeks-to-a-first-draft?utm_source=course&utm_campaign=wow-cga-cors-171009-firstdraft&utm_content=974087_UNV_WD-PM171009-12+Weeks+to+a+First+Draft&utm_medium=email

Dive into the world of writing and learn all 12 steps needed to complete a first draft. In this writing workshop you will tackle the steps to writing a book, learn effective writing techniques along the way, and of course, begin writing your first draft.

Session One: Strategies From the Start

Discuss five time-tested strategies to employ prior to the start of your novel.
Session Two: The Starting Point: Exposing Exposition

Examine how four great American novels employ exposition and inciting incidents in their opening pages.
Session Three: Beginning the Climb: Discovering Your Novel’s Tension

Take an in-depth look at the beginning of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, making note of techniques that can be implemented for building tension within your own novel.
Session Four: Continuing the Climb: The Layering Effect In Character, Plot and Setting

Consider the possibilities of adding characters, plot, or setting changes in order to add layers and depth to your novel.
Session Five: Clamping In: Moving Forward By Standing Still, A Lesson in Style

Partake in an in-depth examination at the stylistic range of American writers such as John Updike, as well as strategies for stylistically related pre-writing preparations.
Session Six: Taking a Breather: The Novel’s Caesura

Explore the importance of taking pause and dwelling within the rising action of the novel’s structure.
Session Seven: The Phantom Precipice: From Flat Line to Spike

Examine the strategy of implementing a “fake climax” in order to maintain tension on the uphill climb. Also, familiarize yourself with Hemingway’s “Iceberg Theory.”
Session Eight: Reaching Over the Ledge: The Art of Set-Up

Learn how to properly plant seeds throughout your novel to ensure the largest pay-off. Also, familiarize yourself with Chekhov’s “Gun Theory,” ensuring that you implement this technique within your novel.
Session Nine: The View From the Top: Image as Resonance

Consider the importance of strong, resonant images at the climactic moments of modern films and literature. Explore opportunities to take what we’ve learned from these mediums and insert them into our novels.
Session Ten: Peering Down From the Mountain: Unraveling Plot

Continue planning your characters’ evolutions, ensuring that each plot point and mystery is revealed in a logical and organic manner.
Session Eleven: The Controlled Fall: Dialogue as Parachute

As our novels turn toward falling action, begin reviewing the nuts and bolts of strong dialogue, discussing its proper and improper functions, as well as how you can implement dialogue for the most effect.
Session Twelve: The Return to Ground Level: Graceful Exits

Discover the importance of creating a resonant final scene, including using ambiguity as an ending, as well as other strategies.

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:39 pm
by sammy2
The best alternative seems to be this course on outlining your novel:
https://www.writersonlineworkshops.com/courses/outlining-your-novel

I think I would like this better than the 12 step approach noted above.

Writers often look upon outlines with fear and trembling. But when properly understood and correctly used, the outline is one of the most powerful weapons in a writer's arsenal.

With the help of the book Outlining Your Novel: Map Your Way to Success by K.M. Weiland, you will learn how to write an outline, including what type of outline is right for you, brainstorm plot ideas, and discover your characters.

As the syllabus shows there are lots of different outlines and ways of doing them. It also includes brainstorming as well as defining the other key parts of the novel including premise, backstory, characters, settings, story structure and more.

Session One: Choosing the Best Outlining Method for You

Introduction to the Workshop
Conventional Outlines
Unconventional Outlines
Creating Your Story Summary
Session Two: Crafting Your Premise

Brainstorming Your Premise
Discovering the Components of a Solid Premise
Accessing Originality
Finding Your Story’s “Extraordinary Factor”
Session Three: General Sketches: Connecting the Dots

Creating the Scene List
Discovering Your Character’s Motive
Discovering Your Conflict
Discovering Your Theme
Session Four: Character Sketches: Exploring Backstory

Exploring the Inciting and Key Events
Crafting Your Backstory
Utilizing Subtext
Realizing When Your Backstory Is Your Story
Session Five: Character Sketches: Interviewing Your Characters

Creating a Likable and Interesting Protagonist
Avoiding Character Pitfalls
Conveying Your Character
Planning Minor Characters
Session Six: Discovering Your Setting

Choosing the Right Setting for Your Story
Identifying Your Climactic Setting
Using a Real-Life Setting vs. a Made-Up Setting
Bringing Your Settings to Life
Session Seven: Writing the Extended Outline

Planning Your Story Structure
Outlining the First Act
Outlining the Second Act
Outlining the Third Act
Session Eight: Creating the Abbreviated Outline

Understanding Scenes and Sequels
Constructing Motivation-Reaction Units
Understanding Action/Reaction
Evaluating POV Choices

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 1:39 pm
by sammy2
Has anyone got any other WD resources they think might be better to getting our novel written faster better easier ?

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:07 pm
by ostarella
[quote="sammy2"]
Writers often look upon outlines with fear and trembling. But when properly understood and correctly used, the outline is one of the most powerful weapons in a writer's arsenal. [/quote]

"can be", not "is". Depends on the writer and how they work best.

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 2:34 pm
by sammy2
[quote="ostarella"][quote="sammy2"]
Writers often look upon outlines with fear and trembling. But when properly understood and correctly used, the outline is one of the most powerful weapons in a writer's arsenal. [/quote]

"can be", not "is". Depends on the writer and how they work best.[/quote]


Tell it to WD and their teacher. That was not my claim.

However, I have to agree with WD, based on all the writers that I know personally plus a bunch more that I am merely acquainted with.

It *IS* a very powerful weapon when UNDERSTOOD and PROPERLY used. If you don't understand how to organise and plan then you will fail no matter what.
If you dont use it then of course it cant help you at all. And if you dont use it correctly then it wont give you all the potential benefits.

Now that does not say that there may not be some other method that is good. Just that this one is good. I note the total lack of any WD course or book that does anything substantially different. Why is that ? I suspect for lack of a book and a teacher not because they are censoring alternatives.

And planning/organising/outlining is still a powerful weapon even if you prefer to use some other approach.

Your using some other method does not negate what organising and planning could do if you chose to actually use them correctly. Nor does your success with some other approach negate what a proper outlining approach could do for a writer. If you fail with outlining then either you dont understand what it really is or you did not use it correctly, or both. Outlining is guaranteed to work. The only real question is whether it is faster/slower , better/worse, easier/harder than some alternative.

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 4:35 pm
by ostarella
[quote="sammy2"]If you fail with outlining then either you dont understand what it really is or you did not use it correctly, or both. Outlining is guaranteed to work. [/quote]

Well, again, we've had this "discussion" ad nauseum. You cannot make the claim that it is guaranteed to work because you cannot prove that more successful writers use that method (or some variation of it) than successful writers who do not. You believe it works and it may for YOU - once you've used it for your own work of fiction and been successfully published, then we'll know if it worked for YOU. Until then, you're simply repeating what others have said about it and leaping to a conclusion that cannot backed by any facts.

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:01 pm
by sammy2
[quote="ostarella"][quote="sammy2"]If you fail with outlining then either you dont understand what it really is or you did not use it correctly, or both. Outlining is guaranteed to work. [/quote]

Well, again, we've had this "discussion" ad nauseum. You cannot make the claim that it is guaranteed to work because you cannot prove that more successful writers use that method (or some variation of it) than successful writers who do not. You believe it works and it may for YOU - once you've used it for your own work of fiction and been successfully published, then we'll know if it worked for YOU. Until then, you're simply repeating what others have said about it and leaping to a conclusion that cannot backed by any facts.[/quote]



At least a couple of logical fallacies in there. I am merely showing what WD says. They say that if you understand it and use it properly then it does work. Clearly if anybody fails with it then they did not understand it or use it properly. And no, WE have not discussed this before. Dont know if you have ever discussed it or not. I have talked about it with friends in the past but not you .

WD clearly believes it could work for everybody as that is what they are teaching to people to use. If you dont believe it has worked for any of the WD students who took their classes that is on you. I dont have to prove that it worked. The many successful students who have been published are proof enough. I have not yet taken any of their seminars so what I have or have not done is irrelevant and a red herring.

I have not lept to any conclusion. I merely present the factual evidence of how writing is taught by WD and note that many people have successfully used it. If it were a scam wouldnt someone have sued them by now? If there were better methods wouldnt they be offering that as an alternative seminar they offer?

If you think they are all wet (metaphor?) then kindly address your concerns to the editors of WD.
If you have an alternative way of teaching how to then put together a syllabus and pitch your seminar to them. I am sure it would be a top seller for them.
You would make a lot of money and gain a lot of credibility as a teacher at WD university.

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:43 pm
by ostarella
Again, william, ad nauseum.

Just because WD says it does not make it a universal truth - and you're repeating as if it were fact does not make it so.

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:01 pm
by sammy2
[quote="ostarella"]Again, william, ad nauseum.

Just because WD says it does not make it a universal truth - and you're repeating as if it were fact does not make it so.[/quote]


Who is this william you keep mentioning?

You cant deny what WD teaches the 'outlining' methods and that it works. The successful students proves it .

Nobody said anything about universal truth. The logical provable fact is that if you understand it and use it correctly that it works.
If it fails to work that only proves you dont understand it andor you didnt use it correctly.

You should not denigrate a method successfully used by so many just because you cant make it work for you.
Or do you just prefer your own method and so you never really tried to learn it and use it properly?

If you have anything better, or even if you just have a usable alternative, why not create a syllabus and have WD add it to their courses.
And if you can prove that the methods they are teaching are wrong then please do tell the editors of WD.

Re: WD nano kit vs the slower seminar to write your novel

PostPosted: Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:37 pm
by ostarella
Come on, william - everybody knows you're the troll who keeps coming back with sock puppets. Your discussions are always the same things - same words, same phrases, and eventually they'll devolve to the same "I'm being picked on by the fascists". It's a broken record and very tiresome.