Ultimate Cheapskate

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Laycrew
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby Laycrew » Thu Nov 15, 2012 7:55 pm

EccentricKim wrote:Denver, eh? Maybe they'll all be able to find lucrative employment with the recent legalizations! hehe


I totally had flashback of my childhood when I lived in Denver. One of my mom's boyfriends use to smoke funny cigarettes. ;) I was in the the third grade when he took me to the museum one day on the city bus and we went barefoot and they wouldn't let us in. Of course that was the 70's.

That was totally off topic and I think this is too, the libraries here have a security guard. A few weeks back when I went, a well dressed, clean-cut man took off his shoes and tried to take a nap in the children's section and he was promptly told he either had to wake up and put his shoes on or leave. Before that I wondered if a security guard was necessary for such a small library and I haven't questioned it since.
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allz28
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby allz28 » Fri Nov 16, 2012 6:20 am

A lot of my writing takes place at various libraries while I travel with my wife on her bank exams. I once calculated that my last novel was written in over 30 libraries throughout the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. I can say that I've never once seen a homeless person in a library.

But come to think of it, I tend to stop shaving when I'm on a writing binge. Maybe people were mistaking me for a homeless person. :lol:

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TerryRodgers
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby TerryRodgers » Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:12 am

:lol:

Ultimate Cheapskate
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby Ultimate Cheapskate » Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:25 am

Lucas - I know the feeling. You might enjoy this excerpt (true story!) from my book "The Cheapskate Next Door":

“I was reminded of my need for a major fashion makeover during the Florida leg of the Tour de Cheapskate, one of my book-tours-by-bicycle. My book signing in Sarasota, Florida, was scheduled one evening at Sarasota News and Books, a very nice independent bookstore in the upscale part of downtown, just a block off the water. I arrived on my bicycle a little early, after nearly a week and 300 miles of pedaling through days of Florida's famous liquid sunshine, one downpour after the next.

I was dressed as I usually am when cycling, in ratty looking shorts and a faded t-shirt (Grand Funk Railroad, as I recall, from the concert I went to in 1978). I decided to take a few moments to relax before the signing, so I sat down on a park bench outside the bookstore with my trusty-but-tattered ten speed and well-worn traveling gear parked next to me.

A nicely dressed older woman walked up to me, opened her purse, and tried to hand me a $10 bill, saying, "You poor man, you look like you could use some help." She was there for the signing, and had no idea that I was the author and not a street person ... although admittedly there's often not much difference between the two.”
- Jeff Yeager --- http://www.UltimateCheapskate.com
Author, "The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches" and three other fine-but-cheap books published by Random House
NBC TODAY Show's Ultimate Cheapskate
Blogging at AARP.org

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TerryRodgers
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby TerryRodgers » Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:30 am

Ultimate Cheapskate wrote:
Hi Terry -

Of course libraries buy the copies to stock in their collections! You don’t think a publisher is going to give libraries free copies so that they can then loan them out for free, do you? ;) That’d be a pretty crazy business model, since, arguably, library distribution already cuts into single copy sales.

Libraries buy copies directly from the publisher under a pricing plan similar, I believe, to the one for regular retailers. I know that my royalties on copies sold to libraries are the same as those for copies sold through bookstores.

In order to get any significant library distribution of a book on a national scale, you really need to be trade published, and ideally by one of the larger houses, which have special sales divisions that work exclusively with the library market. You also usually need to have your book reviewed by at least one of the three major book review publications (Publisher’s Weekly, Kirkus, or Booklist, which is the journal of the American Library Association); most major library systems have a standing policy that they’ll only stock a book if it has a solid review from at least one of those three publications. Fortunately my upcoming book has already received a strong review by Kirkus, and we still expect at least one if not both of the other publications to issue a review.

And here’s the best part: Most libraries provide authors with an honorarium for speaking. Of course it’s not as much as a corporate speaking gig (in my experience, library honorariums have ranged between $100 and $1,000 per event), but you ain’t gonna get any bookstores to pay you a single penny to come and do a signing! I’m actually toying with the idea of organizing another one of my book-tours-by-bicycle next April (during Financial Literacy Month) and speaking exclusively at libraries, since I traditionally get a lot of library speaking invitations during that month, even in a year when I’m not releasing a new book.

Hope this is helpful. (Oh, hey, another piece of good news: My agent recently sold the audio rights to my upcoming book, so it will be released in audio formats as well as print and electronic. Unfortunately the timing is so tight and I’m so busy, I had to pass on the offer to narrate it myself, as I did with the audio edition of my first book.)


That's great. I thought they would, but needed to ask. Pre-ordering 34,000 copies sounds like enough to land you on the NYT?

I like audio books. I listen to them all the time commuting to work. It gives me a different perspective on the writing than just reading the novel. Right now I'm listening to "Under the Dome" by Stephen King. I read the novel as well. The reading helps me to understand the tone of the writing. Just one more tool of learning.

How do the audio rights work? I know that it can cost anywhere from $5k to $20k or more for a reader paid by your publisher. Do you get to pick or meet the reader? Since audio books are so much more than the book, is the contract more lucrative per unit sold?

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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby Ultimate Cheapskate » Fri Nov 16, 2012 8:37 am

Hi Terry -

That range seems high just for narrration, of course it depends on the book (esp. the length) and the narrator (obviously Morgan Freeman would command higher pay than, say, The Ultimate Cheapskate :lol: ). I think $5,000 for the average narration is more like it (I think I got paid $4,000 to narrate my first book, but that was a few years ago); many audio publishers also pay by the completed hours of the final narrated edition.

That said, clearly total production costs (e.g., studio time, production, post-production, rights, etc.) for an audio edition are very substantial, probably easily totalling the top end of your range. But with digital downloads having largely replaced CD's, cassette tapes, etc., at least audio publishers can now get by with a much smaller front end investment when it comes audio formats. My new book will be available as a digital download and as a CD set, although the CD's will primarily be produced for the library market.

And, yes, the author's royalties for audio editions are typically higher per unit than for print copies, particularly for digital downloads. And, of course, formats like CD sets are usually priced quite high, so it's not only a higher percentage, but a higher percentage of a higher price. All that said, audio sales of my first book weren't that great, with most of the copies being sold to libraries, which will traditionally buy copies of the audio edition if the print version is popular enough in their collections (or, at least, larger library systems usually buy the audio editions).

I really do regret that I don't have the time to narrate this book myself, as it's a pretty neat - but stressful - exercise, and since I write mostly in the first person, I'd like it to be my voice. Although, as I discovered when I narrated the audio edition of my fist book: "If you think about it enough, there's really no word that you can't some how mispronounce." :oops:
- Jeff Yeager --- http://www.UltimateCheapskate.com
Author, "The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches" and three other fine-but-cheap books published by Random House
NBC TODAY Show's Ultimate Cheapskate
Blogging at AARP.org

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allz28
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby allz28 » Fri Nov 16, 2012 1:41 pm

Ultimate Cheapskate wrote:Lucas - I know the feeling. You might enjoy this excerpt (true story!) from my book "The Cheapskate Next Door":

“I was reminded of my need for a major fashion makeover during the Florida leg of the Tour de Cheapskate, one of my book-tours-by-bicycle. My book signing in Sarasota, Florida, was scheduled one evening at Sarasota News and Books, a very nice independent bookstore in the upscale part of downtown, just a block off the water. I arrived on my bicycle a little early, after nearly a week and 300 miles of pedaling through days of Florida's famous liquid sunshine, one downpour after the next.

I was dressed as I usually am when cycling, in ratty looking shorts and a faded t-shirt (Grand Funk Railroad, as I recall, from the concert I went to in 1978). I decided to take a few moments to relax before the signing, so I sat down on a park bench outside the bookstore with my trusty-but-tattered ten speed and well-worn traveling gear parked next to me.

A nicely dressed older woman walked up to me, opened her purse, and tried to hand me a $10 bill, saying, "You poor man, you look like you could use some help." She was there for the signing, and had no idea that I was the author and not a street person ... although admittedly there's often not much difference between the two.”


Hahahahaa. This is a prime example of your philosophy. If you were simply a cheapskate, you'd have taken her $10 bill.

James A. Ritchie
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby James A. Ritchie » Fri Nov 16, 2012 2:07 pm

Edward G wrote:
TerryRodgers wrote:[quote="

I used to go to libraries constantly, but I find them kind of redundant now.


How can a hundred thousand free books be redundant? I use Google a bunch, but pretty much none of those books are to be had for free on Google, and I sure as heck can't afford to buy half the novels I read, let alone the hundred of books I use for research.

Google gets too much wrong, and contains only snippets of what a full nonfiction book has between the covers. Comparing Google research with library research is like comparing a ten year old Volkswagen with a brand new Lamborghini.

James A. Ritchie
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby James A. Ritchie » Fri Nov 16, 2012 2:10 pm

I envy anyone who can narrate a book. If Elvis came from backwoods Appalachia, and spoke with a mouthful of Alka Seltzer, well, that's me.

Like Neil Gaiman. Every time I listen to him read a story I just want to stop talking.

Ultimate Cheapskate
 
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Re: Ultimate Cheapskate

Postby Ultimate Cheapskate » Fri Nov 16, 2012 2:20 pm

allz28 wrote:
Ultimate Cheapskate wrote:Lucas - I know the feeling. You might enjoy this excerpt (true story!) from my book "The Cheapskate Next Door":

“I was reminded of my need for a major fashion makeover during the Florida leg of the Tour de Cheapskate, one of my book-tours-by-bicycle. My book signing in Sarasota, Florida, was scheduled one evening at Sarasota News and Books, a very nice independent bookstore in the upscale part of downtown, just a block off the water. I arrived on my bicycle a little early, after nearly a week and 300 miles of pedaling through days of Florida's famous liquid sunshine, one downpour after the next.

I was dressed as I usually am when cycling, in ratty looking shorts and a faded t-shirt (Grand Funk Railroad, as I recall, from the concert I went to in 1978). I decided to take a few moments to relax before the signing, so I sat down on a park bench outside the bookstore with my trusty-but-tattered ten speed and well-worn traveling gear parked next to me.

A nicely dressed older woman walked up to me, opened her purse, and tried to hand me a $10 bill, saying, "You poor man, you look like you could use some help." She was there for the signing, and had no idea that I was the author and not a street person ... although admittedly there's often not much difference between the two.”


Hahahahaa. This is a prime example of your philosophy. If you were simply a cheapskate, you'd have taken her $10 bill.


And just for the record, Lucas, I did indeed decline her generous offer of that ten spot. Although, she did buy quite a few copies of my book at the signing that evening, all inscribed with some variation of "Ten bucks? I may be cheap (and dirty) but I ain't easy." We actually kept in touch after that signing - both sharing some laughs over our first encounter - and she offered me some very good advice about living the good life on less. She passed away this last winter.
- Jeff Yeager --- http://www.UltimateCheapskate.com
Author, "The Ultimate Cheapskate's Road Map to True Riches" and three other fine-but-cheap books published by Random House
NBC TODAY Show's Ultimate Cheapskate
Blogging at AARP.org

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