Get a Makeover for Your Nonfiction Book Concept

My most popular writing conference session in 2008 was all about creating high-powered nonfiction book concepts. Most people concentrate on writing the proposal, but don’t realize that without a salable and compelling hook to anchor it, you can have the best proposal in the word, but it won’t sell.

Because it’s such a popular session, I’m offering it through WritersOnlineWorkshops as a 90-minute webinar on January 29 ($79 fee), where I’ll be speaking in live time about how to create a great selling handle for your book. During the webinar, I’ll live-critique the first 25 concepts submitted by registrants, plus give the next 25 registrants an offline critique. Consider it an extreme makeover for your nonfiction book. You can register here.

To give my blog readers a sneak preview of what this is like, if you leave a summary of your nonfiction book (100 words or less) in the comments section, I’ll choose one or two to critique on this blog tomorrow.

Photo credit: Striatic

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0 thoughts on “Get a Makeover for Your Nonfiction Book Concept

  1. Cathy

    Jane,

    I second those who thank you for this opportunity. Unfortunately, I spotted the typo in my last sentence after I hit "submit." I wonder, might this cause you to hit delete if this were a real book pitch?

    I was in a hurry. Sorry.

    Cathy

  2. Cathy

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