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Ask a Literary Agent Anything: Here’s Your Chance!

Categories: Agents, There Are No Rules Blog by the Editors of Writer's Digest, WD Magazine, What's New Tags: agents, jessica strawser.
Ask a Literary Agent

Photo by Colin_K (on Flickr via Fotopedia.com), Creative Commons License

Is there a question you’ve always secretly wished you could ask a literary agent? Maybe you want privileged information … or maybe you want real, tell-it-to-me-straight advice. Maybe something’s been bugging you for a while, but you’re too afraid of sounding like an amateur if you speak up … or you’re too professional to risk sounding bitter. Maybe you haven’t gotten up the nerve to ask what you really want to know about what goes on behind closed doors in Manhattan publishing. Or maybe you’ve just never gotten the chance to ask.

Well, writers: This is it! Submit your question—polite or disagreeable, starry-eyed or frustrated, serious or half-joking—about writing, publishing or anything in between—in an email to writersdigest [at] fwmedia [dot] com with “Ask an Agent” in the subject line. Or leave it in the comments section below. Feel free to submit anonymously (your secret is safe with us!). You may just get a response straight from an agent in the pages of a future issue of Writer’s Digest magazine—and/or right here at WritersDigest.com.

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6 Responses to Ask a Literary Agent Anything: Here’s Your Chance!

  1. smokeytreats6 says:

    Dear ask an agent,

    Please forgive me, as I am an absolute amateur, I am attempting to write my first book, based on true events, but of course embellished some for a better story, my question is, what are the odd of successfully getting a book published in today’s market? After some research I find that the market is over-saturated, and full of people like myself, yearning for chance to see pages put to print. Is this something I should pursue, or simply keep my 9 to 5? I thank you in advance for any response I might receive, and for any advice that may help me along.

  2. rickrbc says:

    Would it be a good idea to give my book away for free to get my name out there?

  3. ChiTrader says:

    I often see listings of agents who actively seeking queries for “thrillers” and some who are actively seeking “thriller/suspense” novels or just plain “suspense” novels, as if both genres are essentially the same. Is there a difference to an agent? If so, how does one know to send their “suspense novel” to one particular agent but not to another agent who are both looking for “thriller/suspense” manuscripts? For the record, I call my WIP a suspense novel even though it may be thrilling in parts, but from what I have learned is more accurately described as a suspense novel. Do most agents consider the two genres to be “virtually the same?” Am I making a big mistake in sending my query for a suspense novel to an agent that only says he/she is interested in “thrillers?” Thanks.

    Chris

  4. JEK says:

    My question is related to submissions. If an agent asks for X number of pages and that ends in the middle of the sentence/paragraph/chapter etc. where do you draw the line of finishing things out for a submission? I know if its pages and pages you probably don’t want to finish the chapter but you also don’t want to stop in the middle of a sentence or possibly a paragraph so how do you handle that?

  5. punkrockster says:

    In conjunction with wakedreamer’s question, is it harder to break into the market or be taken seriousley if your from a small town in Canada? As well what are agents current thoughts on E-books? Two questions i know, but theres not many here yet. ;)

  6. wakedreamer says:

    Does age affect publishing a book?
    Would a person below the age of 18 be at a disadvantage because they may be prejudiced to be worse than an adult at writing?
    If so, how could one get around this problem or use their age as an advantage?

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