Fibonacci Poetry: A new poetic form!




Fibonacci poetry was founded by Gregory K. Pincus last year as a 6-line poem that follows the Fibonacci sequence for syllable count per line.


For the 6-line poem that means:



  • 1 syllable for first line
  • 1 syllable for second line
  • 2 syllables for third
  • 3 syllables for fourth
  • 5 syllables for fifth
  • 8 syllables for sixth

An example:


“Confession”


My
first
poem
was not a
Fibonacci or
even an unrhymed sestina.


There are variations where the Fibonacci expands even further with each line, but to understand how to accomplish this, you need to understand the Fibonacci math sequence of starting with 0 and 1 and then adding the last two numbers together to add to infinity.


0+1=1
1+1=2
1+2=3
2+3=5
3+5=8
5+8=13
8+13=21
13+21=34
and so on and so forth…


Anyway, those lines can easily get more and more unwieldy the more you let them expand.


Here’s how my example might expand, for instance:


“A Longer Confession”


My
first
poem
was not a
Fibonacci or
even an unrhymed sestina;
my first poem was not a sonnet or triolet,
a ghazal or haiku; my first poem wasn’t free form, either: I don’t know what it was. 


Yeah, 21 syllables is a lot of syllables for one line. So, there’s another variation that has taken flight in making Fibonacci poems that ascend and descend in syllables.


My tired example:


“A Bell Curve Confession”


My
first
poem
was not a
Fibonacci or
even an unrhymed sestina;
my first poem wasn’t a sonnet,
triolet, ghazal,
haiku or
even
free
verse.


For poets who also like mathematics (am I the only one raising my hand?), this is definitely an interesting form to get your mind working.


*****


Here’s more on the Fibonacci poem:



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Check out other Poetic Forms here.

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