2011 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 29

For four weeks, we’ve poemed our hearts out. Now, we’re just a Two for Tuesday prompt and tomorrow away from completing this challenge. Let’s roll up our sleeves and work some magic.

There are two options for today’s prompt:

  1. Write an evening poem.
  2. Write a day-time poem.

Here’s my attempt:

“As the day turns to evening crossing the Ohio”

I watch an airplane twist its way into
the atmosphere before spotting a young
couple stranded along the Interstate.
She stands on one side of the car–hazard
lights flashing–and he sits on the other
in a spare tire that he’s unable
to change. From her open door, she’s waiting
for someone to rescue her while all
he can do is curse and glare at his feet.
Minutes later, I see an elderly
woman drag a buck to the median
after slamming it with her car. A doe
lies on its side on the other shoulder.
Then, a new plane lands. I can’t help catching
it all while wondering how they are
connected–trying not to wreck myself.

*****

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And check out my other blog: My Name Is Not Bob.

*****

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250 thoughts on “2011 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 29

  1. taylor graham

    WAKING ON THE MOGOLLON

    First light through the window.
    Best news of the day, blue sky,
    the observatory obscured by pines.

    She’s seen enough of planet Mars,
    the fierce red eye coming ever closer.
    War. Car wreck. A lost dog.

    Planets stay out of each other’s space.
    Sandstone cliffs a constant of this Earth
    spinning her breakneck into sunrise.
    *
    Spinning her breakneck into sunrise,
    planets stay out of each other’s space.
    The observatory obscured by pines.

    Best news of the day, blue sky,
    sandstone cliffs a constant of this Earth.
    First light through the window –

    war, car wreck, a lost dog,
    the fierce red eye coming ever closer.
    She’s seen enough of planet Mars.
    *
    She’s seen enough of planet Mars.
    Sandstone cliffs a constant of this Earth,
    the observatory obscured by pines.

    Planets stay out of each other’s space.
    War – car wreck – lost dog –
    the fierce red eye coming every closer.

    Best news of the day, blue sky.
    First light through the window
    spinning her breakneck into sunrise.

  2. taylor graham

    CREATURE CHRISTMAS

    The Tax Collector
    lives atop his hill-with-a-view.
    Our neighbor’s goat, displaced by his easement,
    forages the lower, weedy slopes.

    This season’s bad for taxes.
    The homeless camp behind Lucky closed down.
    A bulldozer pushed tents and lawn-chairs
    into dirt-piles with uprooted manzanita.
    Now, that parcel has been leveled
    for another mall. Construction jobs.

    I drive my little Honda east up Main.
    The historical hanged-man effigy still hangs
    from the old condemned saloon.
    Window-paint angels and holly wreaths
    cover For Lease signs on all the vacant shops.

    My mind can’t take in Santa parties.
    Carols on the radio, “In the bleak midwinter….”
    People with ample homes of their own
    gather in other people’s homes to eat and drink,
    and discuss what to do about
    the town’s food bank and soup kitchen.

    Neon eyes catch my headlights,
    low to the ground.
    I park my car, walk up my host’s front steps.

    A rat high-wires from porch-light
    to the dark that draws a shadow beyond
    tonight’s holiday cheer.
    In rat-flight it chitters above my head, balancing
    by its long tail, and resumes its night.

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