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Writing Editor Blogs

Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Chuck Sambuchino

GLA Editor Chuck Sambuchino keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences on his blog. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read Chuck’s Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest

Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Questions & Quandaries
by Brian Klems

Don’t know the difference between “who” and “whom”? Facing an ethical dilemma about accepting gifts from subjects? Let the informative (and humorous) columnist Brian A. Klems answer some of your most pressing grammatical, ethical, business and writing-related questions. Check out his advice and don’t hesitate to ask a question—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer

Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


They Turned My Book into a Movie

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BY BRENT HARTINGER There’s definitely something about having your book turned into a movie. My friends have all known for years that I make my living as a writer of fiction. But … Read more

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 258

Robert Lee Brewer

A little later with the prompt today, but that’s only because I’m shaking off a poetry hangover from last night in Hickory, North Carolina. Happy to report that I met long-time Poetic … Read more

Sara Tracey: Poet Interview

Sara Tracey

Please join me in welcoming poet Sara Tracey to Poetic Asides. Sara is the author of Some Kind of Shelter (Misty Publications, 2013) and Flood Year (dancing girl press, 2009). Her work … Read more

New Literary Agent Alert: Holly Lorincz of MacGregor Literary

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New agent Holly Lorincz of MacGregor Literary is seeking: “I am currently only accepting general market submissions in these areas: historical romance, literary or classic westerns, political or conspiracy thrillers, women’s fiction, or literary fiction.” Read more

Live Query-A-Thon with Literary Agents Kate McKean & Jim McCarthy: March 13 Webinar (w/ Query Critique)

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In this live webinar, literary agents Kate McKean and Jim McCarthy invite you to peek behind the curtain and watch exactly what happens when an agent considers your query. Working from the submissions they receive (all queries will be made anonymous), participants will have the chance to read along with them as they decide whether to stop reading or carry on. You’ll see the exact moment in query letters that each perks up or passes. Think of it like American Idol: Query Edition. Along the way, you’ll garner helpful tips on what to avoid as you write your own query, how to stand out from the pack (in a good way), and what goes on in an agent’s mind as they consider your material.

It’s called “What an Agent Really Thinks While Reading Queries: A Live Query-A-Thon,” and it happens at 1 p.m., EST, Thursday, March 13, 2014. All attendees get their query critiqued by the agent instructors. The webinar lasts 90 minutes. At least four agents have signed writers after critiquing their work as part of a WD webinar. Read more

Taylor Graham: Poet Interview

Taylor Graham and her dogs.

The next poet in the Top 25 series from the 2013 April PAD Challenge has made herself known so well that I feel she doesn’t need an introduction. But here’s the thing: … Read more

6 Rules for Writing a Medical Thriller

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So you’ve decided to write a medical thriller. Your hopes are high. If Robin Cook, Michael Palmer, and Tess Gerritsen could do it, why can’t you? The answer is: you can. Medical thrillers appeal to a wide audience, and many literary agents and editors are looking for the next fresh voice in the genre. So go for it! See if you’ve got what it takes. But first, here are six helpful rules to keep in mind…

GIVEAWAY: John is excited to give away 2 free copies of his novel to random commenters. Comment within 2 weeks; winners must live in Canada/US to receive the book by mail. You can win a blog contest even if you’ve won before. (UPDATE: carolee1968 won.) Read more

2014 April PAD Challenge: Guidelines

Poem Your Heart Out

Well, this year will be the 7th annual April PAD Challenge on the Poetic Asides blog, and I’ve never been more excited about it. This year we will make something happen that … Read more

3 Good Things About Disturbing Fiction

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I did not at any point request that my teacher refer to me as “the most happily disturbed writer” he’s ever known, nor did I request this quote be emblazoned across the top of my first book. And, yet, there it is.

I wasn’t at first comfortable with this. My wife and children don’t really think of me as a “disturbed” person, and as people who care about the world my wife and I don’t really relish the suggestion that I might be compounding the world’s troubles by adding to its many disturbing stories with even more “disturbed” stories of my own.

But the more I thought about it, the more I realized being “happily disturbed” didn’t have to be the identity problem I’d first feared. The fact is, I am disturbed. The world and its many problems do disturb me. If the world didn’t disturb me, I’m not sure I would be a writer of fiction. Read more

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 257

Robert Lee Brewer

It’s been a little quiet at Poetic Asides the past week or so–but that’s only because I’ve been getting all my ducks in a row for the 7th Annual Poetic Asides April … Read more

14th Free “Dear Lucky Agent” Contest: Contemporary Middle Grade Fiction

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Welcome to the 14th (free!) “Dear Lucky Agent” Contest on the GLA blog. This is a recurring online contest with agent judges and super-cool prizes. Here’s the deal: With every contest, the details are essentially the same, but the niche itself changes—meaning each contest is focused around a specific category or two. So if you’re writing contemporary middle grade fiction, this 14th contest is for you! (The contest is live through EOD, March 18, 2014.) Read more

New Literary Agent Alert: Cate Hart of Corvisiero Literary Agency

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Cate is seeking: Cate is seeking Young Adult and Middle Grade, New Adult and Adult Romance (specifically Historical Romance), and select erotica and LGBT. She is a fan of quirky, character-driven Young Adult, and snort-out-loud Middle Grade adventure. She loves Historical and Fantasy and would like to find a steampunk that explores new settings and ideas beyond Victorian London. She is also interested in magical realism, high fantasy, mystery, and any combination of the above. Read more

Ask Not What Your Readers Can Do For You…

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I’ve been seeing a lot of posts recently, listing different ways readers can support authors. Most of them are pretty good ideas: buy their books, give them reviews, etc. I’m all about supporting authors; my book budget alone could support an army in one of those countries you’ve never heard of. (Assuming said army liked to read middle grade and YA.)

But when I read these lists, I can’t help wondering if the authors who post them spend as much time thinking about what they can do for their readers as they do about what readers can do for them. I know, I know, you spent years slaving over your manuscript. Isn’t that enough? Read more

3 Ways Military Service Has Made Me a Better Writer

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Since I first saw Ralph Bakshi’s animated Lord of the Rings, I knew I wanted to be a writer. I’m not alone in that. Lots of folks dream of getting a book deal someday. They chase the dream in a lot of ways. Reading obsessively. Going to writing conferences. Signing up for English Literature or Creative Writing MFA programs.

Me? I joined the military.

My third novel hits shelves in just two weeks, coming out from the biggest publisher in the world. I’ve got three more under contract after that. Sure, joining the military maybe wasn’t the most obvious route, but I sure am glad I did it. Here’s what it taught me… Read more

How to Write a Picture Book That Sells — Feb. 27 Webinar (with full book critique!) by Agent Jennifer De Chiara

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Are you thinking about writing a picture book and don’t know where to start? Have you written several but haven’t been able to interest agents or editors? In this new live webinar on Feb. 27, 2014 called “How to Write a Picture Book That Sells,” you’ll learn everything you need to know to not only write a picture book, but also write one that sells.

Literary Agent Jennifer De Chiara has more than fifteen years’ experience working with picture book authors – helping them create story ideas, editing their manuscripts, and selling their work to major publishers. She’ll share with you the tips and tricks of her trade to help you become a published picture book author, whether you only have a story idea you’ve always wanted to develop or a finished manuscript you don’t quite know what to do with or have had trouble selling to a publisher. It all happens at 1 p.m., EST, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, and lasts 90 minutes. All attendees get a full picture book critique. Don’t forget that at least 4 agents who have taught WD webinars have signed clients afterward from the event. Read more

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 256

Robert Lee Brewer

The temperature is supposedly bottoming out today (20-ish degrees colder than yesterday). I don’t know, because I haven’t been outside yet. But it does “sound” cold. Before jumping into today’s prompt, I … Read more

How I Got My Agent: Elizabeth Blackwell

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“How I Got My Agent” is a recurring feature on the Guide to Literary Agents Blog, with this installment featuring Elizabeth Blackwell, author of WHILE BEAUTY SLEPT. These columns are great ways for you to learn how to find a literary agent. Some tales are of long roads and many setbacks, while others are of good luck and quick signings. Elizabeth’s agent is Danielle Egan-Miller of Browne & Miller Literary Associates. Read more

Pamela Klein: Poet Interview

Pamela Klein

One thing I’ve learned over the years is that many poets follow Poetic Asides by reading what everyone else is doing, and they either play along anonymously in the shadows or don’t … Read more

Literary Agent Spotlight: Rena Rossner of The Deborah Harris Agency

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Rena is seeking: “I am most interested in representing Fantasy and Science Fiction in all its permutations – Adult, Middle Grade, Young Adult etc. I also look for Middle Grade and Young Adult contemporary stories and I’d be open to MG/YA mysteries and thrillers as well. I represent quite a few picture books and I’m always looking for those. In terms of adult books, I look for Literary Fiction, Historical Fiction, multicultural books, and I’d also consider adult mysteries, thrillers and psychological suspense, but not cozy mysteries. I specifically look for literary work (in any genre,) and books with elements of magical realism and the fantastic. You will steal my heart for sure if it’s set in the Middle East, in Israel or if it has Jewish or Israeli themes and characters, but I’m open to all themes, settings and characters. You’ve got to have a really good reason to send me non-fiction, or cookbooks, but if you have a reason that seems to fit with who I am and what I’m looking for, I’ll take a look.” Read more

6 Steps to Seeing Your Book Published

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Step Five: Breathe. Take time to walk away from your masterpiece and breath. Get a fresh perspective from a trusted adviser. Take time to vent about your long writing journey. And take time to walk away for entire days, hell maybe a week or two. Time when you have left your thoughts on writing to the birds. Free your mind, meditate on life and it’s beauty, but what ever you do, remember that stepping away and thinking of other things can help you re-evaluate what you are putting on each digital or physical page. Read more

The Five W’s (and One H) of Soliciting Feedback

Allen Ginsberg may have written by the mantra of “First thought, best thought,” but when it comes to many of us, intense bouts of revision allows the “best thought” to rise to … Read more

Stretching the Facts in Historical Fiction

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My novel GIRL ON THE GOLDEN COIN is based on Frances Stuart, who posed as Britannia on England’s coins three hundred years ago. As soon as I started writing, I felt a sense of responsibility to make her story as accurate as possible. Scouring sources for facts about her life revealed many unanswered questions. I ended up using as many facts as I could and just fictionalized the gaps. The first draft was done before I realized there are opposing opinions out there as to how the fact-fiction balance should be handled in this genre.

Many stress the importance of accuracy in historical fiction. Others think too many historical details sink the story. Still more believe it isn’t possible to achieve total historical accuracy in storytelling. Almost all agree that the author’s choices should be explained in an author’s note. The degree of emphasis an author places on fact versus fictionalization might be considered a matter of writing style. Read more

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 255

Robert Lee Brewer

For today’s prompt, write a handheld poem. Whether it’s video games, smart phones, or soft tacos, the world is filled to the brim with things that can be held in one hand … Read more

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by J. Kent Messum

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1. The book business is a great business: Trust me. I spent fifteen years in a really bad business: the music business (a super sleazy viper’s nest of an industry). I’m not saying the book biz doesn’t have its problems, but I’ve largely found publishing to be a well-oiled machine. Most of those employed within it are exceedingly professional and have a tremendous love of books, working tirelessly toward the success of them. Also, the book business isn’t as time-sensitive as music or film. You can get your first book published when you’re twenty-something, or forty-something, or sixty-something… Read more

How to Write a Fast-Draft Novel

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If you’ve ever tried to write a fast draft during NaNoWriMo (National Novel-Writing Month) and been unable to complete it, you’re not alone. Plenty of people attempt to get that important first draft down on paper, so they can move to revisions with an eye for deepening characters and motivations, and finessing the plot. But more often than not, writers end their month of drafting with a partially-written draft that they’ll never look at again.

It doesn’t have to be this way! Don’t go into fast-drafting alone and without a plan. Find some camaraderie, some writer friends who will hold you accountable, and then make a solid plan for the book you’d like to not only finish, but market one day. Here are a few suggestions to help you put a plan into place before you start drafting, so you have a better chance of success…

GIVEAWAY: Denise is excited to give away a free copy of her novel to a random commenter. Comment within 2 weeks; winners must live in Canada/US to receive the book by mail. You can win a blog contest even if you’ve won before. (UPDATE: Ron Estrada won.) Read more

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