Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Brian A. Klems
Online Editor Brian A. Klems covers everything about writing on his blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, he’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from himself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out his advice—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Cris Freese
The GLA blog keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read the Guide to Literary Agents Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest
Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer
Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


2017 April PAD Challenge: Next Steps

We did it! Here are some numbers for the 2017 challenge: 30 days 34 prompts (including 4 “Two for Tuesday” prompts) 12,000+ comments (and counting) 1 incredible month! So, what’s next? First off, there’s a lot of poetry and poeming that happens around the Poetic Asides blog throughout the year. I’ll...

Love Your Agent? We Want to Hear From You

Calling all agented, published (or soon-to-be published) writers: We're hard at work on our next agent-focused issue, and we want to hear from you. What do you love about your agent? How has your author/agent relationship enriched your writing life in unexpected ways?

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 30

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “The (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles could include: “The Poets,” “The Good Guys,” “The Bad Guys,” “The Last Thing She Said,” and so on. *****...

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 29

For today’s prompt, write a metric poem. Most of the world uses the metric system to measure things out; not so much in the States. But there are meters and liters, and the occasional millimeters. Also, poetry uses metrics (the study of meter in poetry). And metrics, in a general sense,...

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 28

For today’s prompt, write a poem about a smell. Similar to Day 6’s prompt about writing a poem about a sound, today’s prompt involves thinking about the various good and bad smells that fill the world. Pick one smell (or a variety, I suppose), and write a poem. ***** Re-create Your...

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 27

Today is Poem in Your Pocket Day; so carry around a poem in your pocket today. Or roll like me and carry a poem in your pocket every day. For today’s prompt, use at least 3 of the following 6 words in your poem (using a word or two in your...

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 26

For today’s prompt, write a regret poem. Most people regret some action they’ve taken over the years, whether it’s saying the wrong thing, making the wrong choice, or putting off something for a tomorrow that never comes. Write about your own regrets, or the regrets of others (this is a great...

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 25

It’s time for that final two-for-Tuesday prompt of April. Regulars probably already know what the prompt is. Here are the two prompts for today: Write a love poem. The poem could be about lovers, but also the love of family, love between friends, or even loving your job, chocolate, or music....

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 24

For today’s prompt, write a faith poem. For some people, faith means religion. For others, faith means trusting in science and mathematics. Still others, think George Michael’s “Faith” just as some immediately conjure up Faith Hill. Regardless of where you put your faith (or don’t), today’s poem gives you an opportunity...

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 23

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “Last (blank),” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “Last Starfighter,” “Last Unicorn,” “Last Day of Summer,” “Last Cookie in the Cookie Jar,” and so on. *****...

Weekly Round-Up: Just Keep Writing

Every week our editors publish somewhere between 10 and 15 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we’ve created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week’s posts all in one place....

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 22

For today’s prompt, write a fable poem. A fable is a story that conveys a moral, usually told with animal characters. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the first draft. Rather, it’s an extension of the creation...

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 21

For today’s prompt, pick an object (any object), make it the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles could include: “Toothbrush,” “Rake,” “Pilot G2 Premium Gel Roller Pen,” or any number of other objective titles. Have fun with it. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have to...

2017 April PAD Challenge: Day 20

After today, we’ll be 67% of the way through this challenge. Only 10 days to go! For today’s prompt, write a task poem. The task can be some glorious duty, or it can be a seemingly small and insignificant job. Or the poem can take someone to task. It’s your task...