Pitching

How to Establish a Connection With an Agent

Previously, I wrote about the three basic parts of a query letter to an agent.  In part one (the first paragraph), I recommend explaining two things: what the book is and why you’re contacting the agent.  To address this second aspect, I thought I’d mention the most common ways to establish...

Meeting Agents at Conferences—Make a Good Impression

Here's a bit of advice you probably thought I would never say ... When you're at a writers conference, and there are agents there, don't be afraid to not pitch them. Wait a second. Back up. Let me explain. At conferences, there are designated "pitch times" where writers meet with agents, or...

A Quick Post re: Pitchfest

Hey, guys– I’ve gotten some emails and questions about Pitchfest, so just wanted to respond real fast… 1)  Rosetta– I’m not sure if/when Pitchfest itself is coming to New York… lemme sniff around a bit.  I’ll also try to round up some info on some other pitch festivals, or similar events,...

Sell Your Movie or TV Show… and Say Hello… at Pitchfest!

Hey, everyone– Just wanted to invite you all to next month’s annual Great American PitchFest, where I’ll be speaking and doing pitch and project consultations. For those of you who haven’t been to PitchFest, it’s a two-day festival where writers, producers, directors, and other filmmakers can take classes, network, and pitch...

Pitch Your Idea to Producers & Agents… Next Tuesday!

Hey, guys– Huge thanks to everyone who came to last night’s pilot-writing seminar at mediabistro… it was a terrific turnout, and I really appreciate everyone coming and being so interested! For those of you who couldn’t make it… or those of you who have actual TV show ideas you’d like to...

PITCH WORKSHOP: Wendy's feedback (Entry #9)

I wanted to take today to respond to Wendy’s sitcom idea, “Three-Two-One,” which she submitted to the pitch workshop last month.  First of all—Wendy, thanks so much for submitting this!  And another huge thanks to everyone who posted a comment!   For those of you just coming to the party, here’s...

Breaking into Television: My Interview with Alex Epstein

Hey, folks– Just wanted to point you to an interview I recently did with Alex Epstein, TV writer and author of Crafty TV Writing: Thinking Inside the Box and Crafty Screenwriting: Writing Movies That Get Made.  Alex writes the “Complications Ensue” blog, which– if you’re not already reading it– is a...

PITCH WORKSHOP: CC's Feedback (Entry #8)

Hey, folks— I wanted to spend today responding to CC’s Pitch Workshop submission for her one-hour TV dramedy, Sarah Weekly. First of all—thanks again to CC for submitting to this!  Whether you’re pitching Steven Spielberg, a low-level TV exec, or just looking for critical feedback, it’s never easy putting your ideas...

PITCH WORKSHOP: Entry #7 Feedback

Hey, folks— Today’s Pitch Workshop entry comes from Mary S., who sends in a logline for her feature romantic comedy.  Take a look… First of all—Mary, thank you so much for sending this in!  Secondly, thanks to everyone who has already offered Mary their feedback and criticism… I hope it was...

PITCH WORKSHOP: ENTRY 5

Today’s submission to the Script Notes Pitch Workshop comes from Matt in Montreal, who is looking for feedback on his synopsis for his feature idea, Downsize This! (although he’s not married to the title).  He also says:“I’m aiming for a Jim Carrey inspired, farout main Protagonist, contrasted with an even wilder...

PITCH WORKSHOP/READER QUESTION: The Importance of Loglines

Hey, everyone— Just wanted to give a quick follow-up to Tuesday’s episode of the Script Notes Pitch Workshop… and an answer to a question asked by Scott, the author of Tuesday’s Pitch Workshop entries.  Scott writes: “Wow, thank you so much for all your help. You are completely right, I know...

PITCH WORKSHOP: ENTRY 4

Hey, everyone— Today’s submission to the Script Notes Pitch Workshop comes from Scott, who submits loglines for two feature ideas.  So before we dive in… Scott—thank you so much for sending these!  The Pitch Workshop is one of my favorite parts of doing this blog, and I always wish people would...

PITCH WORKSHOP: RESURRECTED… AND ENTRY #3

Hey, everyone— So, it’s been a while since we’ve visited or talked about the SCRIPT NOTES PITCH WORKSHOP, but I don’t want to let it fall through the cracks.  In fact, I’d like to revamp it a bit.  Originally, I’d proposed doing it in two or three-week stages: for a certain...

Pitch With a Partner?

Q. One of (my group’s writers) is co-authoring a book. She wants to know if she and her co-author would be advised to pitch this book to agents together at our upcoming conference, or if they should they pitch separately, maximizing their coverage. What should they do? A. Depends. I recently...

THE SCRIPT NOTES ONLINE PITCH WORKSHOP!

Hey, film and TV writers— I’ve gotten several emails and questions from readers with specific questions about pitching projects they’re working on, asking if there’s some way to use Script Notes to really get down-and-dirty, hands-on advice about shaping their TV and film projects.  After all, whether you’re a newbie just...

Agent Advice: Brandi Bowles of Foundry Literary + Media

This installment features Brandi Bowles of the Howard Morhaim Literary Agency in New York. Brandi has been an agent with Howard Morhaim Literary Agency, Inc., in Brooklyn, New York, since 2007. She was previously an assistant editor at Three Rivers Press. She is seeking: She represents fiction in the areas of...

How to Pitch an Agent

Literary Agent Kristin Nelson of Nelson Literary Agency has recently posted several blog posts regarding how to craft a pitch – i.e., how to sum up your story in a query letter. Some writers find composing the query and pitch extremely frustrating, even to the point where they would rather write another novel...

Pitching an Agent (2008 GLA Article Excerpt)

2008 Article Excerpt: Literary agent Dan Lazar talks about howwriters can successfully pitch theirstory to an agent. “…It’s also important here to nail down some kind of central conflict. Again, try to avoid generic descriptions. A main character ‘finding himself’ is too generic. Generic = boring. Every character goes through internal...