New Agent Alert: Jack Perry of Max & Co.

 

Reminder: New literary agents (with this spotlight featuring Jack Perry of Max & Co.) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.

 


About Jack
: In 1994, Jack joined Random House and went on to become Vice-President of Sales & Marketing for Random House, then head of Sales for SourceBooks and Scholastic. He recently landed with Max & Co., a Literary Agency and Social Club.

Seeking: He will focus upon nonfiction books with a foundation in history, business, politics, narrative nonfiction, math, and science. He also likes sports. And music. In fact, if the writing is good enough, he can be led to a vast array of topics.

How to submitJackwperry38@hotmail.com. E-query, and include a brief synopsis and biography stating what the book is and who you are. “Ideally both will point to a very large collection of people willing to drop $24.95 to read your work. We appreciate direct & cogent proposals (well…at least in others). Then include sample chapters as attachments, one of which must be your opening (we like to see how you take the stage). If more than four weeks have passed without a response, write again or call. E-mail was never intended to carry the burden we all now place upon it. Stuff gets lost in the ether.”


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0 thoughts on “New Agent Alert: Jack Perry of Max & Co.

  1. JohnO

    This could be clearer, Chuck. "He will focused upon narrative books with a foundation in history, business, politics …" Both fiction and nonfiction have narratives. What categories are we talking about — EXACTLY?

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