Editing Your Own Work (2008 GLA Article Excerpt)

2008 Article Excerpt:

Writer Candy Davis talks about how
anyone can successfully edit their own
fiction work and get it ready for an
agent’s consideration.

” … Your book’s unique proportion of scenes and sequels should produce a characteristic rhythm an agent can easily recognize as the perfect pulse for the work: staccato for quick-paced action genre, more legato for a genre that focuses on internal process. Running too many scenes together allows no space for the character to evaluate his progress.
      Each scene should begin and end with a hook, and should capture a complete and meaningful ‘story event.’ Keep scene length appropriate to your genre, and never longer than necessary to cover the episode. Cut mundane interactions, placeholder dialogue and extraneous background information. A sequel generally follows a major plot point, steps up the stakes and turns the story in a new direction. Allow the character a moment to evaluate past mistakes, realize a previously overlooked or rejected option, and take the first step toward a new and more desperate plan.”

      – “With an Agent’s Eye: Edit Your Work Like a Pro” (page 18)

The 2008 edition is a bit outdated
now, so grab the 2010 edition!

While Guide to Literary Agents is best known for its large and detailed list of literary agencies, every edition has plenty of informational articles and interviews designed to help writers perfect their craft and contact agents wisely. The 2010 edition is no different, with more than 80 pages of articles addressing numerous writing and publishing topics.

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