Author Archives: Jess Zafarris

About Jess Zafarris

Jess Zafarris is the Content Strategist of Writer’s Digest and an energetic multimedia journalist with more than 7 years of experience in digital and print publishing, writing and editing. She spends much of her spare time researching curious etymologies and writing about them at UselessEtymology.com. Follow her at @jesszafarris or @uselessety on Twitter.

Going Viral

You have (or a character has) created a computer virus that is capable of spreading to every computer, tablet or smartphone in the world. It takes over the device's screen and displays something else instead—a message, an image, an animation, etc. What does it display, and why?

Handwriting Anatomy

Consider your handwriting, or a character's handwriting. What significance does it have, and what does it say about the type of person you/they are?

Unexpected Inking

You are showering one morning when you notice a tattoo on your body that you're quite sure you don't remember getting. What is it, how did you get it, and what does it mean?

The Vow of the Peacock

You're sipping champagne at the stroke of midnight on January 1, 2018, enjoying your celebration and not giving much thought to tomorrow. Suddenly, you notice that there is a large peacock standing beside you. You're not quite sure where it came from, or if the bird is even real. The peacock...

Whatever of the Year

For this week's prompt, write a story or a scene that involves someone or a group of people—or even something, given that personal computers were once awarded the title—doing something so historically or culturally significant that they could be named Person of the Year. Your honoree(s) could be entirely fictional, or...

GLA News

If you're an agent looking to update your information or an author interested in contributing to the GLA blog or the next edition of the book, contact Jess Zafarris at jessica.farris@fwmedia.com.

Spiced Architecture

You (or a character, or perhaps two) have been enjoying a leisurely walk down a familiar wooded path for about an hour, when you suddenly realize that you no longer know where you are. Trusting that your current path will lead you back home—because it logically should—you turn around and head...