Author Archives: Baihley Grandison

Your Story #85: Submit Now!

Prompt: Write a short story, of 700 words or fewer, based on the photo at left (or below for mobile users).You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story. Use the submission form below OR email your submission directly to yourstorycontest@fwmedia.com. IMPORTANT: If you experience trouble with the submission form, please...

Your Story #84: Vote Now!

Prompt: Write the opening sentence (just one sentence), of 25 words or fewer, to a story based on the photo to the left. (For mobile users, it will appear below.)You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story. Vote now to help choose our winner for Your Story 84! Read the...

Your Story #83: Winner!

Write a short story, of 700 words or fewer, based on this prompt: A man is surprised to find himself feeling both pleased and liberated by the news that he will soon die. Once again, you’ve made the Your Story competition a success! Thanks to everyone who participated in competition #83 (either by entering,...

Your Story #82: Winners!

Write the opening sentence (one sentence only, 25 words or fewer) to a story based on the  photo on the left. You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story. Thanks to everyone who entered and/or voted in WD’s Your Story 82! Here are the results. The top 10 winners are as...

A Writer’s Guide to British vs. American English

Upon my recent discovery that, in England, “English muffins” are merely dubbed “muffins” (I know), my curiosity was piqued: What are some ways vocabulary may differ across the pond? This infographic comparing everyday differences in British and American English is a gem (or as the Britons call it…a gem. But I digress.)

Your Story #81: Winner!

Prompt: Write a short story, of 700 words or fewer based on the prompt at left. (For mobile users, it will appear below.) You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story. Once again, you’ve made the Your Story competition a success! Thanks to everyone who participated in competition #81...

Take 3: Bonus Q&A’s From Fiction Editors

Fifteen fiction editors at top publications answer our trio of questions to get to the heart of what they’re really looking for in short story submissions—and how yours can stand out. Here are bonus responses we didn’t have space to print in the magazine.

Your Story #80: Winners!

Prompt: Write a line (just one sentence only, of 25 words or fewer) that best describes what’s happening in the prompt at left. You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story. Thanks to everyone who entered and/or voted in WD’s Your Story 80! The top 10 winners are as follows:...

#ThrowbackThursday: Kurt Vonnegut in WD in 1985

At Writer’s Digest, we’ve been fortunate to have the opportunity to speak with some of the world’s bestselling and most beloved authors. Back in 1985, one of those authors was Kurt Vonnegut. Over his 50-plus-year career, he published 14 novels—among the most notable, Slaughterhouse-Five, Cat’s Cradle and Breakfast of Champions—along with five plays, five works...

#ThrowbackThursday: Old-School Ads in Writer’s Digest

Writer’s Digest has been around for nearly 97 years—which means that developments in technology and shifts in culture have, in many ways, wildly altered the litterateur landscape. (Some things, though, like pen, paper, and a good ol’ copy of White’s Elements of Style, never go out of fashion.) For this week’s blast from the past, we curated some of...

Your Story #79: Winner!

Prompt: Write a short story, of 700 words or fewer, based on the photo prompt on the left. You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story. Once again, you’ve made the Your Story competition a success! Thanks to everyone who participated in competition #79 (either by entering, reading or voting). Out...

Want To Earn More Money at Your Job? Be a Good Writer

You don’t have to be a writer to benefit from solid writing skills—For proof, just check out the results of this study from the folks at Grammarly: This infographic is courtesy of Grammarly. Visit them online at grammarly.com. Baihley Grandison is the assistant editor of Writer’s Digest and a freelance writer. Follow her on Twitter @baihleyg, where she mostly tweets about writing...

#ThrowbackThursday: Charles M. Schulz of “Peanuts” in 1965 WD Yearbook

It’s always cool to discover old issues of Writer’s Digest featuring now-famous authors talking about their early years. It’s even more exciting to find authors sharing their longtime love of WD—like this interview with “Peanuts” creator Charles M. Schulz (with a comic he created just for WD!). For the best of present-day Writer’s Digest, check out...

Enter the WD Your Story Contest For a Chance to Be Published

In every issue of WD, we run a column called Your Story—a place readers can share their most creative responses (in the form of a 700-word short story or a 25-word first liner, depending on the contest) to an editor-selected picture or sentence prompt. It’s free to enter, and the winning entry(s) get published in Writer’s Digest (So, win-win!). Think...

#ThrowbackThursday: Stan Lee on the Cover of Writer’s Digest in 1947

Nowadays, you can’t watch a Marvel movie without a cameo by Stan Lee: As co-creator of The Fantastic Four, Spiderman, X-Men, Avengers and more, he’s as much of a Marvel celeb as any comic-book character. We featured him in Writer’s Digest in 1947—long before the invention of The Fantastic Four in 1961 propelled Lee to major fame—while was was working as...

18 Words You Didn’t Know You Needed

While the English language possesses incredible breadth, it nowhere near encompasses the span of expression. Sometimes, we just don’t have the words—for example, being able to define the phenomena of “hearing a joke so poorly told and unfunny you couldn’t help but laugh,” or “the urge to pinch something that is irresistibly cute.” That’s where these fantastic non-English words come...

#ThrowbackThursday: Writer’s Digest October 1922

Some 90-odd years ago, Writer’s Digest was still providing valuable tips and insight on the writing craft. We dove back into our archives—a full bookcase of hardbound antiques that would make any writer/booklover swoon—to give you a glimpse at some of our favorite bits from the October 1922 issue. For the best of present-day Writer’s Digest, check...

Your Story #78: Winners!

Prompt: Write the opening sentence (just one sentence), of 25 words or fewer, to a story based on the photo to the left.You can be funny, poignant, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story. Thanks to everyone who entered and/or voted in WD’s Your Story 78! Here are the results. The top 10 winners are as follows:  ...

How Does a Word Get Into the Dictionary?

It’s not uncommon for 1,500–2,000 new words to be added to the dictionary every year—and while most additions we barely register (“cold turkey,” “meet-cute”), others (“FOMO,” “hella,” “ICYMI”) can seem less … dictionary-y. To find out just how words nab the high honor of being dictionaried, we went to the pros at Merriam-Webster. The process, it turns out, is...